Call for Papers: Printing technologies

Printable functional materials and devices

This focus issue will cover state-of-the-art efforts that address a variety of approaches to printable functional materials and devices.

Printing technologies in an atmospheric environment offer the potential for low-cost and materials-efficient alternatives for manufacturing electronics and energy devices such as luminescent displays, thin film transistors, sensors, thin film photovoltaics, fuel cells, capacitors, and batteries.

Significant progress has been made in the area of printable functional organic and inorganic materials including conductors, semiconductors, dielectric, and luminescent materials

These will enable exciting advances in printed electronics and energy devices. Some examples are printed amorphous oxide semiconductors, organic conductors and semiconductors, inorganic semiconductor nanomaterials, silicon, chalcogenide semiconductors, ceramics, metals, intercalation compounds, and carbon-based materials.

This focus issue will cover state-of-the-art efforts that address a variety of approaches to printable functional materials and device. The focus issue will include both invited and contributed papers reflecting recent achievements. Prospective authors are encouraged to submit contributions reporting the original research results or reviewing key emerging trends in printable functional materials and devices for publication in this focus issue.

Find out more.

ECS Urges Constituents to Join ORCID

ORCID

ORCID is unique in its ability to reach across disciplines, research sectors, and national boundaries and its cooperation with other identifier systems.

ECS is pleased to announce that it recently became a member of the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) registry. ORCID is an open, non-profit, community-based effort founded by academic institutions, professional bodies, funding agencies, and publishers to create and maintain a registry of unique researcher identifiers intended to remedy the systemic name ambiguity problem seen in scholarly research. ORCID resolves the confusion brought about by name changes, the cultural differences in name order presentation, and the inconsistent use of first-name and middle-name abbreviations on published research papers.

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U.S. Energy Department Moves to Open Access

ECS Open Access Word CloudWe have been beating the drum about open access here at ECS for some time. This taken from Interface magazine over one year ago:

Commercial publishers have learned that the subscription-based model could be played to their enormous benefit, placing a further cost on the scholarly publishing system. There has been a proliferation of new journals being added to subscription packages, burdening library budgets with additional journals and without providing reciprocal scientific value. This has been coupled with the excessively high prices being charged by many scientific publishers for the dissemination of technical knowledge, and collectively the money now being extracted from the process is stifling scientific advancement. (Read the rest.)

(We noted when Tesla was getting it right, too.)

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My Top 5 Reasons for Publishing with ECS

ECS Open Access Word CloudThis is from ECS President Paul A. Kohl.

One of the joys of being President of ECS is contacting ECS contributors about good news. I am especially excited about ECS journals and the direction they are taking. I believe they are the quite simply The Best Place to publish electrochemical and solid state papers – especially now they are also enabling Open Access (OA). In short, ECS journals (JES, JSS, EEL, SSL) are:

  • well-established–we have been publishing since 1902
  • high quality–our peer-review is excellent and we publish one of the most-cited journals
  • fast–submission to first decision regularly takes less than a month; and once the paper is accepted it usually takes ten days or fewer for the Version of Record to be published online–faster than any other journal in our field
  • open access–authors now have the choice of publishing as Open Access, which enables the widest possible distribution because there is no subscription or barrier for readers to access your paper
  • FREE open access for many of our authors: publishing OA is free to ECS members, ECS meeting attendees, and authors coming from subscribing institutions

No other journal offers this combination of quality, speed, and full open access at no cost to the author.

By publishing your research in our highly respected journals–and choosing to make your papers Open Access–you’re helping us make OA widespread and sharing the outputs of your important research with scientists around the world. I did (see my latest article) and will be doing so in the future.

Yours,

Paul

Paul A. Kohl
ECS President

PS: Find out how to publish your manuscript.

Disappearing Websites

WayBackMachine Logo

Luckily someone is saving everything.

Zoltan Nagy calls himself a semi-retired electrochemist, but he’s doing anything but being retired. After 15 years in a variety of electrochemical industrial research, he spent 30 years at Argonne National Laboratory carrying out research on electrode kinetics and surface electrochemistry. Now he’s at the Chemistry Department of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

He wrote to ask that we let people know the two rather popular and often visited websites:  ‘Electrochemistry  Dictionary and Encyclopedia ” and “Electrochemical Science and Technology Information Resource (ESTIR)” which were hosted by the Yeager Center at Case-Western Reserve University went off-line in January because their  computer died, and it could not be restarted there because of some new university regulations.

Work is on the way to relocate these websites to a new host, hopefully in the not too distant future.

You can have a look at what they used to be on what’s called the WayBackMachine (check out any old versions of websites BTW). Once you get there paste in electrochem.cwru.edu/encycl/ and click on January 1, 2014. Then try http://electrochem.cwru.edu/estir/ and select February 3, 2013.

It’s a gold mine of electrochemical information.

ECS Cancun Proceedings

ECS Digital Library

Easy-to-search, high-tech platform ensuring a progressive atmosphere for the exchange of knowledge and ideas.

The proceedings of 18 Cancun symposia (B1, B2, F2, F3, H6, P1, P3, P6, P7, Q3, Q7, Q1, Q2, Q5, Q6, Q8, Q9, and Q10) from the 2014 ECS and SMEQ Joint International Meeting will be published in ECS Transactions (ECST) in late September, just before the meeting in Cancun.

Make sure to order your copies now with your early-bird registration!

Check out previous proceedings in the meantime.

Defects in Wide Band Gap Semiconductors

Workshop on Defects in Wide Band Gap Semiconductors
September 23, 2014
University of Maryland, College Park

Maryland Nano Center

Call for abstracts.

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

Abstracts accepted in the following categories:

GALLIUM NITRIDE AND SILICON CARBIDE AND RELATED COMPOUNDS

  • Origin of defects in wide band-gap semiconductors
  • Extended defects in wide band-gap semiconductors
  • Defect reduction strategies
  • Atomic level control of material growth
  • Growth optimization and growth yield
  • Defect dynamics in extreme environments

WIDE BANDGAP POWER DEVICES

  • Defect-device performance-reliability correlations
  • Defect-manufacturing yield correlations
  • Role of defects in wide bandgap power electronics
  • Defect modeling and defect-device performance models
  • Defect characterization, in-situ and in real time
  • Advanced defect characterization in both ground and excited states
  • Defect modeling in ground and excited states
  • Manufacturing yield and cost reduction strategies

Instructions and submission template.

DEADLINE JULY 28

Latest Open Access Papers

ECS Digital Library

Easy-to-search, high-tech platform ensuring a progressive atmosphere for the exchange of knowledge and ideas.

As of today, 205 Open Access papers have been submitted to ECS journals of which 87 were published to the ECS Digital Library. Here are the three latest:

Atomic Layer Etching and Cleaning

Here’s our latest Call for Papers:

Atomic Layer Etch (ALEt) and Atomic Layer Clean (ALC) are emerging as enabling technologies for sub 10nm technology nodes. At these scales performance will be extremely sensitive to process variation.

Atomic layer processes are the most promising path to deliver the precision needed. However, many areas of ALEt and ALC are in need of improved fundamental understanding and process development. This focus issue will cover state-of-the-art efforts that address a variety of approaches to ALE and ALC.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Surface reaction chemistry and its impact on selectivity
  • Plasma ion energy distribution and control methods
  • Novel plasma sources and potential application to ALEt & ALC
  • Innovative approaches to atomic layer material removal
  • Novel device applications of ALEt & ALC
  • Process chamber design considerations
  • Advanced delivery of chemicals to processing chambers
  • Metrology and control of ALEt & ALC
  • Device performance impact
  • Synthesis of new chemistries for ALEt & ALC application
  • Damage free surface defect removal
  • Process and discharge modeling

FIND OUT MORE!

Deadline for submission of manuscripts | December 17, 2014

Free the Science

ECS Open Access Word Cloud

What is clear is that an important part of the future is the increasing adoption of Open Access.

This piece, by ECS Executive Director, Roque Calvo, appeared in Interface, Spring 2014 issue. This is the heart of where we are headed as an organization. (The new Interface is out soon. Watch your mailboxes. Find out how to subscribe to our journals.)

Since the dawn of modern science, the key to scientific advancement has been the exchange of knowledge in publications, meetings, and through other collaborations; and in the past decade we have experienced a significant change in the way this scientific exchange occurs. Digital information and the Internet have dramatically improved our ability to disseminate science on a worldwide scale and should lead to global advances at a pace never considered before. But there are obstacles because these technological advancements in the digital age have come at a high cost to scholarly publishing; not for producing scientific content but for the cost of dissemination incurred by users of the research and their institutions.

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