Quantum dotsTiny crystals called quantum dots are used in LCD TVs to enhance color and image quality. A few years ago, scientists discovered a new type of crystal called nanoplatelets.

Like quantum dots, these two-dimensional structures are just a few nanometers in size, but have a more uniform flat, rectangular shape. They are extremely thin, often just the width of a few atomic layers, giving the platelets one of their most striking properties—their extremely pure color.

Now scientists have solved the mystery of out how these platelets form—and then created them in the lab using pyrite.

“We now know that there’s no magic involved in producing nanoplatelets, just science,” says David Norris, a materials engineering professor at ETH Zurich.

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BatteryA team of scientists from Oak Ridge National Laboratory is using the precision of an electron beam to instantly adhere cathode coatings for lithium-ion batteries. This new development, as reported in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, could lead to a leap in efficiency that saves energy, reduces production cost, and eliminates the use of toxic solvents.

This from ORNL:

The technique uses an electron beam to cure coating material as it rolls down the production line, creating instantaneous cross-links between molecules that bind the coating to a foil substrate, without the need for solvents, in less than a second.

Read the full article.

“Typical curing processes can require drying machinery the length of a football field and expensive equipment for solvent recovery,” says David Wood, co-author of the study. “This approach presents a promising avenue for fast, energy-efficient manufacturing of high-performance, low-cost lithium-ion batteries.”

Read the full paper, “Electron Beam Curing of Composite Positive Electrode for Li-Ion Battery.”

Every four years since 1987, scientists and engineers have been gathering in Honolulu, HI for the Pacific Rim Meeting on Electrochemical and Solid State Science, better known as PRiME. ECS has been committed to holding PRiME in Hawaii since its establishment to provide a central location for researchers from around the world, from the U.S. to Japan, to gather and discuss that latest scientific developments.

Because of his extensive experience in organizing PRiME and various other meetings across Latin American and Europe, ECS Executive Director Roque Calvo was invited to speak at the East Meets West Spring Education Tour, which is a meeting of executive directors, CEOs, and meeting planners, both of nonprofit and for profit companies, to discuss holding international conferences.

Hawaii’s talk show, Think Tech, reached out to Calvo during his most recent trip to Hawaii for the East Meets West Spring Education Tour to discuss electrochemistry, the clean energy movement, and open science. Watch the interview below.

GrapheneA team of researchers at the University of Manchester – where graphene was first discovered and won the Nobel Prize – created a graphene-oxide membrane for desalination. The newly developed sieve can turn seawater into drinking water, demonstrating graphene’s ability to filter common salts from water, leading to affordable desalination technology.

Prior to this research, graphene-oxide molecules have garnered significant attention from the scientific community, demonstrating their potential to filter our small nanoparticles, organic molecules, and even large salts. However, researchers have not been able to use a graphene-oxide membrane in desalination technologies, which require very small sieves, until this development.

This from the University of Manchester:

Previous research at The University of Manchester found that if immersed in water, graphene-oxide membranes become slightly swollen and smaller salts flow through the membrane along with water, but larger ions or molecules are blocked.

The Manchester-based group have now further developed these graphene membranes and found a strategy to avoid the swelling of the membrane when exposed to water. The pore size in the membrane can be precisely controlled which can sieve common salts out of salty water and make it safe to drink.

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ECS Mourns the Loss of Bill Brown

Bill BrownWilliam (Bill) David Brown, age 73, passed away on Thursday, March 30, 2017 in Fayetteville, AR.

As an advocate of education, Brown spent many years working as a professor. He started his career in academia at the University of New Mexico (1975-1977), followed by the University of Arkansas (1977-2008), where he served as Distinguished Professor, Head of the Electrical Engineering Department, and Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering.

Brown joined The Electrochemical Society in 1983. Throughout his life, he dedicated himself to ECS, serving as the Society’s president (2010-2011), vice president (2007-2010), and treasurer (1998-2000). Additionally, he served as the secretary, vice chair, and chair of the ECS Dielectric Science and Technology Division; and chaired the Society’s Education Committee (1994-2002), where he was instrumental in the initiation of the highly successful Student Poster Session held at each ECS meeting.

“Bill Brown was one of the Society’s finest leaders and a great teacher and mentor to me, and to many scientists and engineers in his field,” says Roque Calvo, ECS executive director. “He held an incredible number of top leadership positions in ECS but his work involving the Society’s Centennial and Free the Science fundraising campaigns could be his most notable contributions. He will be remembered for his contributions to our science and technology but more so for the character, integrity, and camaraderie that he brought to the Society.”

Brown also served on ECS’s Technical Affairs Committed (2007-2009), Ways and Means Committee (2007-2010), Finance Committee (1998-2002), Financial Policy Advisory Committee (1998-2007), and the Audit Subcommittee (2006-2007).

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March for Science with ECS

ECS is a proud partner with March for Science. On April 22, there will be marches happening around the world as scientists highlight the important role that science plays in improving lives, solving problems, and informing evidence-based policy. The March aligns strongly with ECS’s Free the Science initiative, a key factor of the endorsement.

ECS has fully endorsed the March’s non-partisan, educational, and diversity goals and encourages its members to adhere to these values as they get involved in one of the numerous marches taking place throughout the world.

Here’s how you can help represent ECS’s Free the Science at the March:

  • We’ll be reaching out to the chairs of ECS Student Chapters to make sure that they have the materials and resources available to them to march successfully and with representation. If you’re a student, talk to your chair about getting materials.
  • Use our #freethescience graphic while marching whether you’re printing a poster or making your own. Download it here.
  • Be sure to take a picture of your group and your sign and share it with the tags: #freethescience and #scienceserves.
  • If you received one of our #freethescience t-shirts, bags, pins, or stickers at one of our meetings be sure to bring it with you.
  • The March for Science will be providing a live stream of the main event and speakers in D.C. Take part in the virtual march and be sure to submit photographs and messages that can be shared on their site with ECS’s #freethescience.

Adopting open access and new models of open science is a core competency at the center of the scientific dissemination debate. Don’t let it be left out of the conversation on April 22. Help represent Free the Science while highlighting the importance of your sciences!

The abstract deadline for the 232nd ECS Meeting in National Harbor, MD (October 1 – 6, 2017) has been extended until April 21, 2017!

Submit abstracts

Make sure to read the Call for Papers. With 52 symposia to choose from, there is sure to be one relating to your specific area of research. Don’t miss out on your chance to participate in one of the most prestigious events in electrochemical and solid state science and technology research.

Submit your abstract today!

ECS Subscription Packages

Now is a very important time for institutions to have uninterrupted access to ECS content. A recent evaluation suggests that more than half of ECS published content involves the sustainability of our planet!

Important work in batteries, energy conversion, fuel cells, nanostructures, and more is being released every day from researchers and contributors in ECS peer-reviewed and rapid publication journals, and other ECS titles.

The Society offers various subscription packages:

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BatteryJoint research from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid and the Council for Scientific Research reports the development of a new ceramic electrode for lithium-ion batteries that can lead to cheaper, more efficient, and safer conventional batteries.

“What we have patented are new ceramic electrodes that are much safer and can work in a wider temperature interval,” says Alejandro Varez, co-author of the research.

To achieve this result, the researchers made ceramic sheets by way of thermoplastic extrusion molds.

“This technique allows making electrodes that are flat or tube-shaped, and these electrodes can be applied to any type of lithium-ion battery,” Varez says.

According to the researchers, the cost of production is low and it could easily be adapted into current lithium-ion battery production, making this an easy technology to move quickly to industrialization.

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Hilton, New OrleansHave you made your hotel reservations at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside for the 231st ECS Meeting, being held from May 28-June 1? Don’t miss out on our special discounted rates by booking your room before May 1!

Enjoy a prime location as the only hotel in the city nestled along the banks of the Mississippi River and offering guests the option of relaxing river or exciting city views.

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