Salt Water-Powered Sports Car Makes Its Way to the Road

The battle to produce the most efficient and environmentally friendly car rages on, and now a new company is rising in the ranks by proposing we power our cars with salt water.

The Quant e-Sportlimousine made its debut at the 2014 Geneva Motor Show and showcased its innovative NanoFlowcell technology. This new technology sets itself apart from other systems in its ability to store and release electrical energy at very high densities – all with the help of salt water.

This from Intelligent Living:

The flow cell system powering the Quant e-Sportlimousine’s four electric motors develops electricity from the electrochemical reaction created by two electrolyte solutions. This electricity is forwarded to super capacitors where it’s stored and distributed.

Read the full article here.

The zero-emissions vehicle claims to have a peak of 920 horsepower, 0-62 mph in 2.8 second, and a top speed of 217.5 mph.

The car has passed official inspection, and the company is now testing it on public roads in Germany and Europe as they prepare for series production.

Nunzino La Vecchia, the man behind the development of the sports car, had this to say in an interview with Prestige Electric Car:

“The power density of the nanoFLOWCELL® at 600 W per kilogram or per litre is greater than any comparable system; five times greater, to be specific. That means you can drive five times further with our system than you can with a conventional battery system, including the most state-of-the-art lithium-ion batteries. The system is also extremely safe to operate and environmentally friendly. Most importantly, since there are almost no moving parts and it produces negligible waste heat, it has an efficiency of more than 80%. There has never been anything like it.”

The scientists at ECS are also working on some groundbreaking research in the field of smart cars and electric cars. Head over to our Digital Library to check out the latest findings.

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0 Comments

  1. Scott Calabrese Barton

    September 24, 2014 at 9:55 am

    To clarify, this appears to be a flow battery, and the salts involved are likely to be redox complexes that are much more expensive than normal salt water. One extraordinary claim from the company’s web site is the projected range of 600 km (373 mi) from a 200 L (53 gal) electrolyte tank.

    http://www.nanoflowcell.com/en/quant

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