How Many Marched for Science?

Over one million scientists and science advocates around the world took to the streets on April 22 to celebrate science and bring attention to the role it plays in improving lives, solving problems, and informing evidence-based policy.

In total, there were more than 600 marches in all 66 countries, on seven continents, and in all 50 states (including a few penguin marchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium).

Get all the data and find out what states held the largest marches over on the March for Science’s blog.

And check out some of ECS’s pictures from the march on our Facebook page!

ECS is proud to partner with the March for Science, a global event with almost 400 satellite marches taking place on April 22.

ECS has fully endorsed the March’s non-partisan, educational, and diversity goals and encourages its members to adhere to these values as they get involved in one of the numerous marches taking place throughout the world. You can help represent ECS at your march by using our #FreetheScience graphic on your signs.

And before you take to the streets on Earth Day, check out a few essential reads on the origins of the march and what those taking part hope to accomplish.

From the lab to the streets

Mother Jones sits down with the organizers of the march and look at the reasons behind the mobilization efforts, including pulling scientific funding, budgets cuts to science agencies, downsizing or outright eliminating science advisors in government, and roll backs of agency work based on public health research.

The organizers discuss their goals of championing more public engagement, evidence-based policies, and general science advocacy while balancing the over politicization of the field.

“I would actually argue that science is political,” Valorie Aquino, co-organizer of the march, tells Mother Jones. “Scientific integrity goes beyond one person eroding it. It hits across both sides of the aisle and people who aren’t necessarily affiliated with a political party at all.”

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March for Science with ECS

ECS is a proud partner with March for Science. On April 22, there will be marches happening around the world as scientists highlight the important role that science plays in improving lives, solving problems, and informing evidence-based policy. The March aligns strongly with ECS’s Free the Science initiative, a key factor of the endorsement.

ECS has fully endorsed the March’s non-partisan, educational, and diversity goals and encourages its members to adhere to these values as they get involved in one of the numerous marches taking place throughout the world.

Here’s how you can help represent ECS’s Free the Science at the March:

  • We’ll be reaching out to the chairs of ECS Student Chapters to make sure that they have the materials and resources available to them to march successfully and with representation. If you’re a student, talk to your chair about getting materials.
  • Use our #freethescience graphic while marching whether you’re printing a poster or making your own. Download it here.
  • Be sure to take a picture of your group and your sign and share it with the tags: #freethescience and #scienceserves.
  • If you received one of our #freethescience t-shirts, bags, pins, or stickers at one of our meetings be sure to bring it with you.
  • The March for Science will be providing a live stream of the main event and speakers in D.C. Take part in the virtual march and be sure to submit photographs and messages that can be shared on their site with ECS’s #freethescience.

Adopting open access and new models of open science is a core competency at the center of the scientific dissemination debate. Don’t let it be left out of the conversation on April 22. Help represent Free the Science while highlighting the importance of your sciences!

With the March for Science coming up in April, scientists are debating the pros and cons of getting political.

A new story from NPR explores the nuances of politicizing science, with some scientists supporting the upcoming march to protect science from potential governmental threats, while others believe the March for Science will damage scientists’ reputations for being unbiased.

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