San Francisco Section Daniel Cubicciotti Student Award

The San Francisco Section Daniel Cubicciotti Student Award was established in 1994 to assist a deserving student in Northern California in pursuing a career in the physical sciences or engineering.

Presented: Spring Section meeting, annual

Recipient qualifications

The recipient(s) will be full or part-time graduate or advanced undergraduate student(s) in good standing at a university or college in Northern California. The major field of study may be metallurgy, materials science, chemical engineering or chemistry. Candidates must be involved in thesis research or other academic activities that involve a demonstration or application of electrochemistry. The award application must include:

  • the nominee’s transcript;
  • curriculum vitae;
  • a short description of his or her research activities and non-research interests;
  • a letter of recommendation from a university or college faculty member from engineering, chemistry, physics, materials science, or other appropriate department.

The nominee need not be a member of The Electrochemical Society.

Award

The award consists of an etched metal plaque and a $2,000 prize which is intended to assist with the educational expenses. In addition to the main award, up to two honorable mentions will be given dependent on qualified and deserving applicants. Each honorable mention award will consist of a scroll and a prize of up to $500.

About Daniel Cubicciotti

Daniel Cubicciotti was born in Philadelphia in 1921, but spent most of his life in northern California. His 47-year professional career as a researcher, included 20 years at SRI International and 13 years at the Electric Power Research Institute. Cubicciotti left a legacy to the nuclear industry replete with innovation and usable information in the areas of fuel cladding materials, stress corrosion cracking, Pourbaix diagrams, and microbiologically influenced corrosion. He also helped numerous non-experts in corrosion to appreciate the importance of corrosion processes, and more importantly, provided them with valuable tools to predict where or how attack might occur, and how to mitigate or prevent such problems.

Past recipients

2017 – 2008
Tianyu Liu
Honorable Mentions: Colin Burke
Limei Chen
(2017)
Yiyang Li, Stanford University
Honorable Mentions: William Nguyen, Stanford University
Andrew Scheuermann, Stanford University
Katherine Harry, University of California, Berkeley
(2016)
Karthish Manthiram, University of California Berkeley
Honorable Mentions: Christina Li, Stanford University
Lei Cheng, Lawrence University of California Berkeley
(2015)
Nian Liu, Stanford University
Honorable Mentions: Isaac Markus, University of California Berkeley
Alan Berger, University of California Berkeley
(2014)
Daniel Cohen, UC Berkeley
Honorable Mentions: Mallory Hammock, Stanford University
Anthony Ferrese, University of California Berkeley
(2013)
Allison Engstrom, University of California, Berkeley
Honorable Mentions: Matthew McDowell, Stanford University;
Xiongwu Kang, University of California, Santa Cruz
(2012)
Maureen Tang, University of California, Berkeley
Honorable Mentions: Yi Wei Chen, Stanford University;
Thomas Conry, University of California, Berkeley
(2011)
Venkat Viswanathan, Stanford University
Honorable Mentions: Yi Wei Chen, Stanford University;
Thomas Conry, University of California, Berkeley
(2010)
Paul Albertus, University of California, Berkeley
Honorable Mentions: Andrew Lee, Stanford University;
Mark Oliver, Stanford University
(2009)
Susan Ambrose, University of California, Berkeley
Honorable Mentions: Que Anh Nguyen, UC Berkeley;
Yuan Yang, Stanford University
(2008)

2007 – 1995
James Wilcox, University of California, Berkeley
(2007)
Sarah Stewart, University of California, Berkeley
(2006)
D. Steingert, Departments of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
(2005)
E. Guyer, Stanford University
(2004)
J. Hollingsworth, Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
(2003)
D. Wheeler, Bringham Young University
(2002)
H. Visser, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley
(2001)
L. V. Protsailo, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis
(2000)
M. Tucker, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
(1999)
C. R. Horne, Department of Materials Science & Mineral Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
(1998)
C. Wade, Department of Chemistry, Stanford University
(1997)
Y. Ma, Department of Materials Science & Mineral Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
(1996)
L. J. Oblonsky, Department of Materials Science & Mineral Engineering, University of California, Berkeley
(1995)