New deadline for submitting abstracts:
Monday, December 2, 2019
Submit today!

 

Review the full Call for Papers and also visit the ECS blog to check out topic close-ups for select symposia. No abstracts will be accepted after the extended date.

The 237th ECS Meeting with the 18th International Meeting on Chemical Sensors (IMCS 2020) takes place in Montréal, Canada, from May 10-15, 2020.

We hope to see you in Montréal!

Deadline for submitting abstracts
December 2, 2019
Submit today!

Topic Close-up #7

Symposium B02: Carbon Nanostructures in Medicine and Biology

Symposium focus:

Nanocarbons have unique electronic, optical, and structural properties that enable new applications in biology and medicine. These may include but are not limited to assays, imaging tools, sensors, and therapeutics. The session covers areas including the development of new materials, characterization, uses/demonstration of pharmacology or effects in vitro and in vivo, plant biology applications, and clinical uses.

Nanocarbons Division SES Research Young Investigator Awardee and Keynote Speaker: Prof. Markita Landry, Assistant Professor, University of California at Berkeley

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Deadline for submitting abstracts
December 2, 2019
Submit today!

Topic Close-up #5

Symposium D01: Dielectrics for Nanosystems 8: Materials Science, Processing, Reliability, and Manufacturing

Symposium focus:

The eighth edition of the Dielectrics for Nanosystems symposium, sponsored by the Dielectric Science and Technology Division, will be held at the 237th ECS meeting. The symposium, which started at the 206th ECS Meeting in Hawaii in 2004, is being held after a gap of four years. It will outline the role of dielectrics in research areas of advanced nanosystems involving electronic, optical, magnetic, mechanical, biological, and chemical systems, including sensing devices and energy sources. (more…)

Deadline for submitting abstracts
December 2, 2019
Submit today!

Topic Close-up #4

Symposium A04: Battery Student Slam 4

Symposium focus: This special symposium is dedicated to students working on energy storage and energy conversion. In the student slam, students have the opportunity to present flash oral presentations on their work in a 10-minute time slot. All students enrolled at a valid degree-granting institution may submit an abstract describing their presentation. (more…)

The new deadline is October 8, 2019.

The Electrochemical Society Nanocarbons Division established the Award in 2018 to encourage excellence in nanocarbons research. The award recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the understanding and applications of carbon materials.

ECS invites nominations for the Robert C. Haddon Research Award of qualified individuals who have made outstanding achievement in, or scientific contribution to, the science of fullerenes, nanotubes and carbon nanostructures. The award consists of a scroll, a $1,000 prize, and assistance up to $1,500 to facilitate attendance at the award presentation. ECS has 13 electrochemistry and solid state science and technology divisions, each of which has robust awards and travel grant programs. (more…)

Deadline for submitting abstracts
December 2, 2019
Submit today!

Topic Close-up #3

Symposium D02: Nanoscale Luminescent Materials 6

Symposium focus: This symposium—the sixth in a bi-annual series—focuses on those characteristics of nanoscale materials that relate to their luminescence properties. Relevant topics include: effects of quantum confinement, the role of surface states, loss mechanisms, methods to improve luminescence efficiency, bulk vs. nanoparticle luminescence, and the role of phonons in nanomaterials. (more…)

Jason J. Keleher, professor and chair department of chemistry at Lewis University.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, nearly 7,000 laser strikes on aircrafts were reported in 2017.

“In cities like Chicago this problem is real as people are shining laser pointers on aircrafts during critical phases of flight, which is a big nuisance to pilots,” said Jason Keleher, a professor and chair of chemistry at Lewis University, who was approached by the aviation department at Lewis University to collaborate on a solution to this growing problem .

“Is it a bunch of kids? Is it accidental? Is somebody just like, ‘I bet you can’t hit that plane with those lasers.’ It’s really hard to identify who’s actually doing it. It’s a very interesting problem,” said Keleher, one he, the project’s principal investigator, was prepared to solve.

Keleher explains that although the lasers don’t cause permanent eye damage to pilots as they maneuver the aircraft, it does cause temporary flash blindness which may make it difficult for pilots to see control systems as they prepare for take-off and landing. He explains it is similar to the way high beams can disorient a driver upon direct exposure.
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Credit: Ma et al./Current Biology

Hollywood has long toyed with the idea of superhuman powers, as seen in the 2013 science fiction thriller movie Riddick, where the lead character uses his extraordinary night vision to survive a hostile world. It is one supernatural ability that may be closer to becoming a reality.

According to ScienceDaily, scientists have now made it possible for mice to pick up infrared light with the help of nanotechnology, creating the ability for night vision.

The procedure

It works with a single injection of photoreceptor-binding particles that is inserted into the mice’s eyes, converting photons to high-energy forms that allow the mice to develop infrared vision for up to 10 weeks. The procedure results in minimal side effects and causes no changes to normal vision. (more…)

Vitamin C Helps Gold Nanowires Grow

Gold nanowires grown in the Rice University lab. Credit: Zubarev Research Group/Rice University

Vitamin C offers countless benefits. It helps protect against immune system deficiencies, cardiovascular disease, can strengthen hair, and helps prevent wrinkles. Not to mention, it can also turn stubby gold nanorods into gold nanowires of impressive length.

According to ScienceDaily, scientists at Rice University recently discovered that all it takes is a dose of vitamin C to promote gold nanowires growth, making the wires valuable for sensing, diagnostic, imaging, and therapeutic applications.

According to Eugene Zubarev, a Rice lab chemist who worked on the study, and Bishnu Khanal, a Rice chemistry alumnus and lead author of the study, nanorods measured 25 nanometers thick at the start of the process, maintaining their widths as they grew in height. An important point, as the wires’ aspect ratio—length over width—dictates how well they absorb and emit light and how they conduct electrons. (more…)

New fabric developed by UMD scientists.
Credit: Faye Levine, University of Maryland

When the temperature drops, we layer up. It’s the natural thing to do—until now. According to ScienceDaily, researchers at the University of Maryland have engineered a new fabric that can automatically change its properties to trap or release heat depending on external conditions.

The textile, made from synthetic yarn with a carbon nanotube coating, is activated by temperature and humidity: making it the first of its kind. When conditions are warm and moist, such as those near a sweating body, the fabric allows heat to pass through. When conditions become cooler and drier, the fabric reduces the heat that escapes. Acting like blinds, the individual strands of yarn open and close to transmit or block heat.

(more…)

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