Don’t miss the last webinar of CorroZoom Season 1: Molecular Modeling of Corrosion Inhibitors

Time and Date: June 9, 2021 at 0800h EST
Registration is free
Presenter:
Anton Kokalj
Department of Physical and Organic Chemistry
Jožef Stefan Institute
Ljubljana, Slovenia

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

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Posted in Webinars

Event information

Date: April 9, 2021
Time: 0800 Eastern US (see time chart below for other local times)
Register here (free for all): https://osu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_9KynqrmbTY2teo2gPeLKzw
CorroZoom website: https://fcc.osu.edu/corrozoom

A Framework for Pitting Corrosion Based on Pit Growth Stability 
Gerald S. Frankel
Fontana Corrosion Center, The Ohio State University, USA (more…)

On February 10, 2021, The Electrochemical Society hosted Dr. Reza Javaherdashti’s live webinar, “Microbiologically Influenced Corrosion: Tips, Myths, Skills.” Dr. Javaherdashti is General Manager at Eninco Engineering B.V., The Netherlands. Below are Dr. Javaherdashti’s responses to questions asked in the Q&A session following his talk.

Dr. Javaherdashti has taught more than 5000 hours about electrochemical corrosion, corrosion management, and microbial corrosion to various industries worldwide. In this webinar, he discussed and explained the most important theoretical and practical aspects of microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) and microbiologically influenced deterioration (MID) mechanisms and how industry practitioners can recognize them.

View Dr. Javaherdashti’s Webinar

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Gerald Frankel, Ohio State University Professor and Journal of The Electrochemical Society Corrosion Science and Technology Technical Editor, is hosting CorroZoom, a webinar series focusing on corrosion science. The next webinar, “Corrosion of Additive Manufactured Materials” presented by Nick Birbilis, will take place on February 24, 2021, at 0800h EST.

CorroZoom Webinar
Corrosion of Additive Manufactured Materials
Nick Birbilis
Australian National University

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A recent study warns that U.S. nuclear waste storage containers could corrode, according to Ohio State News.

On January 27, in the paper, “Self-accelerated corrosion of nuclear waste forms at material interfaces,” researchers reported that the “corrosion of nuclear waste storage materials accelerates because of changes in the chemistry of the nuclear waste solution, and because of the way the materials interact with one another,” risking harm to people and the surrounding environment. (more…)

ECS recently lost a devoted, accomplished member, and a cherished friend. Robert Frankenthal passed away on Wednesday, September 18.

Bob held many posts and positions within the Corrosion Division and the Society itself, serving as chair of Pittsburgh Section (1963–64), Corrosion Division chair (1980–1982), and ECS President (1993–1994). He also received numerous awards and honors, including winning the Corrosion Division H. H. Uhlig Award in 1989 and becoming a Fellow of The Electrochemical Society in 1995.

If you would like to learn more about Bob, please visit the page about him on the ECS website, which also includes a long-form interview Roque Calvo, former ECS Executive Director, conducted with him as part of the ECS Masters Series.

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Focus Issue in Memory of Hugh Isaacs

Schematic representation of the gravimetric experimental setup for atmospheric H2 evolution measurements.

By: Gerald FrankelThe Ohio State University

(Note: Gerald Frankel is the Corrosion Science and Technology technical editor for the Journal of The Electrochemical Society.)

I found this paper, Real-Time Monitoring of Atmospheric Magnesium Alloy Corrosion, fascinating and truly innovative. Sanna Virtanen describes a method to make sensitive real-time measurements of the atmospheric corrosion of Mg.

This paper is also the first in the new focus issue on advanced experimental methods in memory of Hugh Isaacs. As such, like the other papers that will appear in that issue, it is open access. Note that submissions to this focus issue are still open.

Gerald Frankel

Gerald Frankel, a technical editor of the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, corrosion expert, and open access advocate.

The aftereffects of the Flint water crisis is still felt strongly four years later. Just this year, dozens of Flint, Michigan, residents were outraged by the state’s decision to end a free bottled water program. A program that came into effect after it was discovered the water in Flint was unsafe for consumption.

The catastrophe came to fruition when measures were taken by elected officials to cut costs. The result of which led to tainted drinking water that contained lead and other toxins.

Gerald Frankel, a professor of materials science and engineering at The Ohio State University, touched on the matter in an ECS Podcast interview.

“It was avoidable,” says Frankel, who explained that because water is corrosive, drinking water is treated to reduce the corrosive effects on the pipes that carry it. However, due to financial issues the town of Flint was facing, their source of the water changed from Lake Michigan to the Flint River. “And they decided not to do this chemical treatment.”

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Corroded pipelinesA new device has given scientists a nanoscale glimpse of crevice and pitting corrosion as it happens.

Corrosion affects almost everything made of metal—cars, boats, underground pipes, and even the fillings in your teeth.

It carries a steep price tag—trillions of dollars annually—not mention, the potential safety, environmental, and health hazards it poses.

“Corrosion has been a major problem for a very long time,” says Jacob Israelachvili, a chemical engineering professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Confined spaces

Particularly in confined spaces—thin gaps between machine parts, the contact area between hardware and metal plate, behind seals and under gaskets, seams where two surfaces meet—close observation of such electrochemical dissolution had been an enormous challenge. But, not any more.

Using a device called the Surface Forces Apparatus (SFA), Israelachvili and colleagues were able to get a real-time look at the process of corrosion on confined surfaces.

“With the SFA, we can accurately determine the thickness of our metal film of interest and follow the development over time as corrosion proceeds,” says project scientist Kai Kristiansen.

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In May 2017, we sat down with Gerald Frankel at the 231st ECS Meeting in New Orleans. Frankel is a technical editor of the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, corrosion expert, and open access advocate. Currently, he is a professor of materials science and engineering at The Ohio State University.

Since joining ECS, Jerry has served as chair of the Society’s Corrosion Division and was named ECS fellow in 2006. His research efforts focus on topics ranging from degradation of materials to atmospheric corrosion. In 2012, he was appointed by President Obama to the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board.

Listen to the podcast and download this episode and others for free on Apple Podcasts, SoundCloud, Podbean, or our RSS Feed. You can also find us on Stitcher and Acast.

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