The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced $15 million for fundamental research or early-stage technology development of new bioimaging or sensing approaches that use quantum phenomena.

Supported efforts will advance research on plant and microbial systems relevant to bioenergy and environmental research. Projects will explore quantum science concepts that promise to enhance image resolution and provide new ways for repetitive imaging to detect fragile samples without damaging them, produce cleaner pictures, and use light beyond the visible range to see unknown features of biological shape and movement. (more…)

Electric VehicleThe U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced $209 million in funding for 26 new laboratory projects focusing on electric vehicles, advanced batteries, and connected vehicles. DOE’s Argonne National Laboratory introduced Li-Bridge, a new public-private partnership to bridge gaps in the domestic lithium battery supply chain. Advanced lithium-based batteries play an integral role in 21st century technologies such as electric vehicles, stationary grid storage, and defense applications that are critical to securing a clean energy future. The projects support goals to make the United States a global leader in electric vehicle and battery innovation; advance the development of these technologies to save families money; lower carbon pollution; and create high-quality jobs. (more…)

Scientsts collecting dataThree US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science Programs are currently accepting applications for the summer 2022 term:

  • Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI)
  • Community College Internships (CCI)
  • Visiting Faculty Program (VFP)

These programs give students the opportunity to conduct research and technical projects at national laboratories. Applications are due by January 12, 2022, at 1700h ET. (more…)

Y. Shirley Meng

Dr. Y. Shirley Meng

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory appointed Y. Shirley Meng to be Chief Scientist at the Argonne Collaborative Center for Energy Storage Science (ACCESS) with a joint appointment as a professor at the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering at The University of Chicago. She assumes the position in January 2022. Dr. Meng joined ECS as a graduate student in 2007 and calls the Society her “professional home.” She is on the Society’s Board of Directors and serves as Chair of the ECS Battery Division. 

“To tackle the climate crisis, sustainable and resilient energy storage is one of the most important technologies humanity needs. I am excited and humbled to take up the role of ACCESS chief scientist. At the same time, as a faculty member of the Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, I hope to build an innovation ecosystem where we can train the next generation workforce, foster meaningful relations with industry both domestic and international, and make breakthroughs in energy storage technologies in the decade to come,” said Dr. Meng. (more…)

ECS member Vimal Chaitanya presents on June 29

Don’t miss the two remaining virtual U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) workshops on Electrochemistry in Industry Applications and Innovation Ecosystem. Join participants from academia, National Labs, industry, and NGO’s sharing their expertise, insights, and vision to help shape government policy regarding electrochemical processes across the U.S. industrial sector. Or, be a listener and learn how adopting electrochemical technologies and strategies could substantially improve the performance of the industrial sector (i.e., energy productivity; thermal efficiency; reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; reduced number of process steps and process complexity; opportunities for technology development to accelerate commercial deployment). (more…)

Webinars on June 15, 17, 22, and 29

Participants are sought from across academia, National Laboratories, industry, and NGOs by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) to provide their expertise, insights, and vision for the use of electrochemical processes across the U.S. industrial sector.

Be an active participant or just a “listener” in a virtual workshop series examining how adopting electrochemical technologies and strategies could substantially improve the performance of the industrial sector, for example in energy productivity, thermal efficiency, reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, reduced number of process steps. Opportunities for technology development to accelerate commercial deployment will also be discussed.

Help identify technologies and associated R&D opportunities related to electrochemical processing systems used in major industries.

Assist in prioritizing the technical areas where AMO funding could have the greatest impact on manufacturing, energy efficiency, and greenhouse gas emission reduction.

Participate in the June 15 kickoff session to help set the agenda for the series. (more…)

A special livestream event at the 239th ECS Meeting with IMCS18 features representatives of a subcommittee of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Basic Energy Science Advisory Committee (BESAC) reporting on research and requesting input on the future of international scientific research. “Benchmarking Innovation: The Future of International Scientific Research” takes place on June 1, from 1400-1500h EDT after which the content will be available through June 26, 2021. The 239th ECS Meeting with IMCS18 is digital. There is no cost to participate, however pre-registration is required.

Benchmark Study

The BESAC subcommittee is conducting an international benchmark study with the goal of identifying key areas of its mission-relevant research and facility capabilities in which U.S. leadership is most challenged. The presenters will also advise participants on new ways to leverage limited resources and identify incentives to attract and retain scientific talent. The session includes a live panel discussion and moderated Q&A. (more…)

Improving Lead Batteries

Photo Credit: Essential Energy Everyday

Lead batteries have been around 1859. They’ve changed our lives, giving us car batteries, standby batteries in case power outages, electric vehicles, and more. Still, despite all this progress, no one really understands the inner workings of lead batteries. According to Essential Energy Everyday, for the last century, lead battery manufacturers have invested much of their research in creating function and production, without fully understanding the underlying chemistry. However, that’s soon said to change as lead batteries are headed for a “high-tech makeover.”

A team of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Lead Acid Battery Consortium, and Electric Applications have joined forces to realize the potential of a venerable battery technology.

Venkat Srinivasan, director of the Argonne Collaborative Center for Energy Storage Science and ECS member, says this is a beautiful example of how synergy between industry and science can drive innovation. (more…)

Renewable grideThe U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released a report Wednesday night on electricity markets and grid reliability, stating that the decline in coal and nuclear production has not impacted grid reliability, instead the rise in a diverse energy portfolio has increased the grid’s stability.

The study, commissioned by Energy Secretary Rick Perry in April, also states that coal plant closures across the country have been due to market pressure and competition from low-priced natural gas plants, not policy changes that support renewables such as wind and solar.

(MORE: Listen to our interview with former U.S. Energy Secretary and Nobel Laureate Steven Chu.)

“America is also fortunate to have a variety of fuel sources. We need to consider how to use each effectively while recognizing our differences and unique state and regional circumstances,” Perry says in the report’s cover letter. “We must utilize the most effective combination of energy sources with an ‘all of the above’ approach to achieve long-term, reliable American energy security.”

While the report does not state that there is a current concern with grid reliability, it does warn that future problems could arise if coal and nuclear plants continue to close at the current rate. Many environmental advocates cite this as a last-ditch effort for these companies to remain relevant in the energy landscape. However, the report does go on to highlight the role of renewables in developing a diverse energy infrastructure.

(more…)

John Staser, professor of chemical engineering at Ohio UniversityImage: Ohio University

John Staser, professor of chemical engineering at Ohio University
Image: Ohio University

ECS member and Ohio University professor, John Staser, was recently granted $1.5M from the U.S. Department of Energy for biofuels research. Staser and his team will work to develop technology to make biorefineries more efficient and profitable, thereby reducing the cost of environmentally friendly biofuels.

Biofuels are combustible fuels created from biomass. Currently, they are the only viable replacement to petroleum transportation fuels because they can be used in existing combustion engines. Biofuels are typically produced from food crops (sugar cane, corn, soybean, etc.) or materials such as wood, grass, or inedible parts of plants. Ethanol and biodiesel are prominent forms of biofuels that offer an alternative to such transportation fuels as petroleum and jet fuel.

Staser will lead an interdisciplinary team to develop ways to process a class of complex organic polymers known as lignin, which is one of the many waste products produced in the biorefining process.

“It’s not really competitive with gasoline, especially if oil is $40 a barrel,” Staser says. “Before this biofuel becomes feasible, we have to find a way to reduce the manufacturing cost. One way to do this is to come up with a secondary revenue stream for the refinery. So, if biorefineries could waste lignin to do so, biofuel would become a more financially feasible option.”

(more…)

  • Page 1 of 2
    • 1
    • 2