Raphaële J. Clément     
Professor
Materials Department
University of California, Santa Barbara, U.S.  

Date: October 27, 2021
Time: 1300h ET
Sponsors: 
Hiden Analytical, Royal Society of Chemistry, American Chemical Society Materials Letters, JEOL USA, Inc. 

The development of next-generation solid state ion conductors hinges on an understanding of microscopic diffusion mechanisms and the identification of roadblocks along macroscopic diffusion pathways (e.g., intragrain defects and grain boundaries). (more…)

Bo Zhang
Professor
Department of Chemistry
University of Washington, Seattle

Date: October 22, 2021
Time: 1300 – 1400h PST
Price:
There is no cost to register for this event.

The webinar is open to the public; ECS membership is not required.
You must preregister through ECS My Account.
Don’t have one? It’s easy to createvisit Create an Account now.

(more…)

Hiroshi Imahori
Professor
Department of Molecular Engineering
Graduate School of Engineering
Kyoto University, Japan

Date: September 22, 2021
Time: 1000h ET
Sponsors:
Hiden Analytical, Gamry Instruments, BioLogic USA

(more…)

Shirley Meng
Professor
University of California, San Diego, U.S.

Date: September 15, 2021
Time: 1300h ET
Sponsors: Gamry Instruments, Hiden Analytical, Nor-Cal Products, BioLogic USA

(more…)

Amy C. Marschilok, Ph.D.
Co-Director, Institute for Electrochemically Stored Energy
Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry
Adjunct Faculty, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering
Stony Brook University, U.S.

Energy Storage Division Manager and Scientist, Interdisciplinary Science Department
Brookhaven National Laboratory, U.S.

Date: August 25, 2021
Time: 1300h EDT
Sponsor: Hiden Analytical

(more…)

Veronica Augustyn
Associate Professor of Materials Science & Engineering
University Faculty Scholar
North Carolina State University, U.S.

Date: August 18, 2021
Time: 1000h EDT
Sponsor: Hiden Analytical

(more…)

Ming Tang
Associate Professor
Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering
Rice University, U.S.

Date: July 28, 2021
Time: 1000h ET
Sponsor: Hiden Analytical

During battery (dis)charging, lithium (de)intercalation in electrodes is usually spatially non-uniform across multiple length scales. Such a phenomenon is a major impediment to battery performance and life as it causes energy under-utilization and induces over-(dis)charging, etc. While reaction heterogeneity is often attributed to mass transport limitation, this talk highlights the important roles of thermodynamic factors including elastic energy and phase transformations, the understanding of which is important for the development of mitigation strategies. Through combined modeling and characterization, how stress could destabilize the lithium (de)lithiation front in single crystalline and polycrystalline intercalation compounds is elucidated. Also, a fundamental driving force for dendrite growth on the lithium metal anode during electrodeposition is provided. Stress relief thus offers a promising approach to improving reaction uniformity at the particle level. At the cell level, the reaction distribution that within the porous electrode is strongly influenced by how the electrode’s equilibrium potential varies with the state of charge, is discovered. Two types of prototypical reaction behavior emerge from common electrode materials with significant impact on the thick electrode performance. This finding leads to an efficient analytical model for optimizing battery configurations in place of common battery cell simulations. (more…)

The Electrochemical Society hosted Prof. John A. Rogers’ live online webinar, “Microfluidic Systems for the Skin: Quantitative Sensing of Biomarkers in Sweat,” on June 23, 2021. Below are answers to questions posed during the presentation.

NOTE: Registration is required to view the webinar.

Professor John A. Rogers is the Louis Simpson and Kimberly Querrey Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Neurological Surgery at Northwestern University, with affiliate appointments in Mechanical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Chemistry. He is also Director of Northwestern’s recently endowed Querrey Simpson Institute for Bioelectronics. Rogers completed an SM in physics and chemistry in 1992, and PhD in physical chemistry in 1995, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He was a Junior Fellow in the Harvard University Society of Fellows from 1995 to 1997; worked at Bell Labs from 1997 to 2002; then served on the faculty of the University of Illinois for 13 years. Rogers received many important awards including a MacArthur Fellowship and membership in the National Academies of Engineering, Sciences, Medicine, Inventors, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Rogers has published more than 750 papers, is a co-inventor on more than 100 patents, and co-founded several successful technology companies.   (more…)

Chockkalingam (Chock) Karuppaiah
Founder and Chairman, Vetri Labs, U.S.
Chief Technology Officer, Ohmium, U.S.

Date: July 14, 2021
Time: 1300h ET
Sponsor: Gamry Instruments & Hiden Analytical

Be it improving energy density or cycle life or reducing cost, understanding the failure modes of batteries in a non-destructive mode is critical during the design, product development, and manufacturing of lithium ion batteries. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) provides the ability to access and decouple the failure modes based on the processes’ time scale. Analysis of recorded EIS can be done either through phenomenological modelling or equivalent circuit modelling, with each having its own pros and cons.

This webinar reviews the basics of applying EIS for understanding the phenomena in lithium ion batteries, the experimental details and protocols, and the types of models with a few case studies. (more…)

John Rogers
Professor
Northwestern University, U.S.

Date: June 23, 2021
Time: 1000h EDT
Sponsor: Hiden Analytical

Recent advances in materials, mechanics, and manufacturing establish the foundations for high performance classes of microfluidic lab-on-a-chip technologies that have physical properties matched to those of human skin. The resulting devices can integrate with the surface of the skin in a water-tight yet physically imperceptible fashion, to provide continuous, clinical-quality biochemical information on physiological status via capture, storage, and in situ analysis of sweat. This talk summarizes key ideas and presents specific recent examples in skin-interfaced microfluidic technologies designed for applications in sports performance, worker safety, and nutritional monitoring. (more…)

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