ECS is accepting nominations for the Henry B. Linford Award for Distinguished Teaching

Application Deadline: April 15, 2019

The Electrochemical Society distinguishes outstanding technical achievements in electrochemical, solid-state science, and technology and recognizes exceptional service to the Society through the Honors & Awards Program. Recognition opportunities exist in the following categories: Society Awards, Division Awards, Student Awards, and Section Awards. We could not do it without you! (more…)

This year marks the 150th anniversary of Dmitri Mendeleev’s discovery of the periodic system—marking one of the most significant achievements in science, which not only captured the essence of chemistry but also of physics and biology. We honor this moment in history by celebrating the “International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements” (IYPT2019) this year, according to IYPT2019.

There are a number of ways you can pay tribute to the invention of the “common language for science.” Explore the periodic table by participating in one of the many activities hosted by IYPT2019, like the IUPAC Periodic Table Challenge for a chance to win a periodic table signed by a Nobel laureate in chemistry, the EYCN periodic table video competition for a chance to win a trip to Paris, or show off your artwork with a creative Mendeleev Mosaic—and more!

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The ECS Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry Division is currently accepting nominations for the prestigious Max Bredig Award in Molten Salt and Ionic Liquid Chemistry that will be recognized at the fall 2020 biannual meeting (PRiME) in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Max Bredig Award in Molten Salt and Ionic Liquid Chemistry: established in 1984 in order to recognize excellence in molten salt and ionic liquid chemistry research and to stimulate publication of high-quality research papers in this area in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society. This award is unique as it directly coincides with the International Symposium on Molten Salts and Ionic Liquids that takes place every two years at our fall biannual meetings. At AiMES 2018, Robin Rogers delivered the Bredig symposium keynote address entitled From Liquid Clathrates to Ionic Liquids and Back Again. Was Anything Learned on the Journey? (more…)

On Friday, February 8, 2019, the ECS New England section will host a meeting featuring a distinguished speaker at Northeastern University, and you’re invited!

Pre-registration and paid dinner reservation is required to attend.

Location

Northeastern University’s Boston Campus
Egan Research Center
Room 305/306 (more…)

TIB Promotes Open Access Transition

Since 2018, all the members of the German consortium of The Electrochemical Society led by the Technische Informationsbibliothek (TIB) – German National Library of Science and Technology have benefited from a special publishing option: ECS grants all institutions participating in its program an unlimited number of article processing charge (APC) credits. This allows all scientists affiliated with participating institutions to publish open access articles in ECS journals free of charge. (more…)

Allen J. Bard

Allen J. Bard, regarded as the “father of modern electrochemistry,” was recently announced the winner of the 2019 King Faisal International Prize in Science. According to UT NEWS, the University of Texas at Austin professor of chemistry received $200,000 and a gold medal from the King Faisal Foundation, as a result of the big win.

Bard, an ECS member for over 50 years, is a big believer in chemistry—the chemistry found among people.

“There’s a chemistry that can develop in a group, and that chemistry can lead to very good science,” says Bard.

So it’s no surprise that his team player mentality has indeed led him to “very good science,” so good it earned him the international award, given to only those who have made outstanding contributions in physics, chemistry, biology, or mathematics through original scientific research that brings major benefits to humanity.

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Deadline for Submitting Abstracts
April 12, 2019
Submit today!

Topic Close-up #1

Symposium L07: Sonoelectrochemistry

Symposium Focus: The sonoelectrochemistry symposium will provide an interdisciplinary forum to discuss a) applications of power ultrasound in electrochemistry and electrochemical engineering, b) the use of sonoelectrochemistry for the fabrication of nanomaterials, c) ultrasound and impact on metallic and polymer coatings, d) measurements and devices based on ultrasound, e) new concepts and methodologies in the field of interfacial sonoelectrochemistry, and f) advances in fundamental understanding of sonoelectrochemistry and sonoelectrocatalysis. Papers are solicited in all areas of electrochemical science in which ultrasound is employed. (more…)

It’s winter. And with that comes heavy coats, icy winds, and occasionally, below freezing temperatures: conditions not favorable for batteries.

Car batteries

Temperature extremes, in general, are not favorable to batteries. According to Lifewire, lead-acid batteries drop in capacity by about 20 percent in normal to freezing weather, and down to about 50 percent in temperatures that reach about -22 degrees Fahrenheit.

As a result, you may find your car battery giving out on any given winter morning. This is due to reduced capacity and increased draw from starter motors and accessories. This is because starter motors require a tremendous amount of amperage to get going: knocking out the capacity of even the newest batteries. (more…)

On a Friday afternoon in 2011, residents of northeastern Japan were hit by a six minute earthquake—shifting the country’s main island by eight feet— triggered powerful tsunami waves that reached up to 120 feet in height, according to Futurity.

Tsunami warnings had initially broadcasted minutes before its arrival; unfortunately, underestimating its size. Many failed to evacuate to higher ground as a result; a total of 15,894 deaths resulted from the natural disaster. Japan has since installed a network of seismic and pressure sensors on the ocean floor that have raised the bar for tsunami early-warning systems worldwide.

New research, which appears in Geophysical Research Letters, suggests how warnings could be more accurate by combining data streaming in real-time from sensors, like those in Japan, with tsunami simulations.

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The Electrochemical Society and Enago have entered into a collaboration that will allow researchers within ECS’s member network easy access to Enago’s author services, including English manuscript editing and publication support, at every stage of the publication cycle.

ECS exists to advance global knowledge and practice in the sphere of electrochemistry and solid state science. It’s an international community, led by scientists, for scientists. Its members, individual and institutional, can take advantage of the vast programs offered, such as awards, grants, fellowships, and much more. (more…)

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