Li-ion Battery Inventor Develops Safer, Longer-Lasting Battery

John Goodenough may be 94-years old, but he shows no sign of slowing down. Now, the co-inventor of the lithium-ion battery has developed the first all-solid-state battery cells that could result in safer, longer-lasting batteries for everything from electric cars to grid energy storage.

“Cost, safety, energy density, rates of charge and discharge and cycle life are critical for battery-driven cars to be more widely adopted,” Goodenough says in a statement. “We believe our discovery solves many of the problems that are inherent in today’s batteries.”

This from the University of Texas at Austin:

The researchers demonstrated that their new battery cells have at least three times as much energy density as today’s lithium-ion batteries. A battery cell’s energy density gives an electric vehicle its driving range, so a higher energy density means that a car can drive more miles between charges. The UT Austin battery formulation also allows for a greater number of charging and discharging cycles, which equates to longer-lasting batteries, as well as a faster rate of recharge (minutes rather than hours).

Read the full article.

A major concern in conventional lithium-ion battery safety is the development of dendrites. When dendrites form in a lithium-ion battery’s liquid electrolyte, explosions and fires can occur. The battery developed by Goodenough and his team looks to combat this issue by using glass electrodes paired with an alkali-metal anode, which prevents the formation of dendrites.

Additionally, the alkali-metal anode increases the energy density and demonstrates more than 1,200 cycles with low cell resistance.

Because the solid-glass electrolytes can operate, or have high conductivity, at -20 degrees Celsius, this type of battery in a car could perform well in subzero degree weather. This is the first all-solid-state battery cell that can operate under 60 degree Celsius.

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