Reinventing the Inductor

ECS member Kaustav Banerjee, and his team, recently discovered a materials-based approach to reinventing inductors.

A basic building block of modern technology, inductors are everywhere: cellphones, laptops, radios, televisions, cars. And surprisingly, they are essentially the same today as in 1831, when they were first created by English scientist Michael Faraday.

The particularly large size of inductors made according to Faraday’s design are a limiting factor in delivering the miniaturized devices that will help realize the potential of the Internet of Things, which promises to connect people to some 50 billion objects by 2020. That lofty goal is expected to have an estimated economic impact between $2.7 and $6.2 trillion annually by 2025.

According to Banerjee, this new approach yields a smaller, higher-performing alternative to the classic design.

Read more on Forbes.com.

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