Open Access Week 2017 Survey

ECS celebrated International Open Access Week 2017 by giving the world a preview of what complete open access to peer-reviewed scientific research looks like. ECS took down the paywall October 23-29, 2017 to the entire ECS Digital Library, making over 132,000 scientific articles and abstracts free and accessible to everyone.

Take a few minutes to tell us more about your experience.

This was the third consecutive year ECS took down its paywalls during Open Access Week, an annual event organized by SPARC, the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition.

Eliminating the paywall during Open Access Week allows ECS to give the world a preview of the potential of its Free the Science initiative.

 

ECS is once again participating in International Open Access Week. It begins on Monday, October 23 and for the week you’ll be able to read and download anything in the ECS Digital Library at no charge. That’s over 132,000 articles and abstracts.

ECS proud to participate in Open Access Week as part of its commitment to Free the Science, an initiative to move toward a future that embraces open science to further advance research in our fields. This is a long-term vision for transformative change in the traditional models of communicating scholarly research. Being open means better collaboration, more impact, and faster progress.

Let your friends and colleagues know what ECS is doing so they too can take advantage of our free research! Discover information in fields like energy technology, communications, transportation, human health and welfare, and the general sustainability of our planet.

PS: If you like what ECS is doing to promote more openness in research communications, please consider supporting Free the Science. Your gift, no matter the size, will help ECS build an example for the world. Donate now!

Get Your ORCID iD!

In a recently conducted survey of corresponding authors, ECS found that 58.3% of the 132 responders had registered for an ORCID iD. Over 31% had not registered, and 10.6% were not sure if they registered; of these individuals, 49% did not know about ORCID.

ECS believes all researchers should be aware of the benefits of registering for an ORCID iD—a free, persistent digital identifier which allows for automated linkages between you, your publications, and your professional enterprises.

Why should you register? Your ORCID iD:

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Tech Highlights

ECS journalsTech Highlights was prepared by David Enos and Mike Kelly of Sandia National Laboratories, Colm Glynn and David McNulty of University College Cork, Ireland, Zenghe Liu of Verily Life Science, and Donald Pile of Rolled-Ribbon Battery Company. This article was originally published in the fall 2017 issue of Interface. Read the full article.

The Effect of the Fluoroethylene Carbonate Additive in Full Lithium-Ion Cells

In recent years, high voltage cathode materials have attracted a great deal of attention due to the high energy densities that they offer. However, side reactions with conventional electrolytes resulting in electrolyte decomposition need to be overcome to make the use of these materials viable for commercial cells. Consequently, various electrolyte additives have been the subject of much research. A team led by researchers from Uppsala University has investigated the effect of fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) as an electrolyte additive in full Li-ion cells consisting of a LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode and a Li4Ti5O12 anode. Read the full paper.

From: B. Aktekin, R. Younesi, W. Zipprich et al., J. Electrochem. Soc., 164, A942 (2017).

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Focus IssuesSubmit your manuscripts to the Journal of The Electrochemical Society (JES) Focus Issue on Processes at the Semiconductor-Solution Interface by October 22, 2017.

This issue of JES will address the most recent developments in processes at the semiconductor-solution interface including etching, oxidation, passivation, film growth, electrochemical and photoelectrochemical processes, water splitting, electrochemical surface science, electroluminescence, photoluminescence, surface texturing, and compound semiconductor electrodeposition, for photovoltaics, energy conversion and related topics.

It will include both invited and contributed papers on both fundamental and applied topics of both bulk and nanoscale materials. The following areas are of particular interest:

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Stephen MaldonadoStephen Maldonado is an associate professor at the University of Michigan, where he leads a research group that focuses on the study of heterogeneous charge transfer processes relevant to the fields of electronics, chemical sensing, and energy conversion/storage technologies. He was recently reappointed as an associate editor for the Journal of The Electrochemical Society (JES) in the area of physical and analytical electrochemistry, electrocatalysis, and photoelectrochemistry.

ECS: When did you become an ECS associate editor? What made you pursue an editorial role at ECS?

Stephen Maldonado: I started my time as an ECS associate editor in 2014. I pursued the opportunity for two different reasons. The minor reason was that I was genuinely curious about the “sausage making” process of accepting/rejecting a paper. That is, as an author, I had prepared and submitted plenty of papers but I had little idea about the other side of it. I had reviewed plenty of papers, too, but how those reviews factored into the final fate of the submission was a mystery.

The major reason, though, is that electrochemistry has been a principal aspect of my adult life. I got into science because, at a fundamental level, I thought electrochemistry was cool. Accordingly, my interests were aligned with the ECS at the start and it has been a major influence on my professional development. After getting tenure, I felt the time was right to give back to this community. So when I was asked to consider the position, I jumped at the chance.

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Focus IssuesSubmit your manuscripts to the Journal of The Electrochemical Society Focus Issue on Ubiquitous Sensors and Systems for IoT by December 26, 2017.

Ubiquitous sensors are becoming an integral part of the Internet of Things (IoT) applications, and progress in this domain can be seen each month. The promise is that everyone and everything will be connected via wireless data collection, and services like healthcare will be brought to everyone, everywhere, anytime, for virtually any need.

These devices sense the environment and provide applications in home automation, home safety and comfort, and personal health. At a macro level, they provide data for smart cities, smart agriculture, water conservation, energy efficiency industry 4.0, and Society 5.0. Other applications include supply chain management, transportation, and logistics.

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Minhua ShaoMinhua Shao is an associate professor at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, where he leads a research group pursuing work in advanced material and electrochemical energy technologies. Shao’s current work focuses on electrocatalysis, fuel cells, lithium-ion batteries, lithium-air batteries, CO2 reduction, and water splitting. Shao was recently named an associate editor of the Journal of The Electrochemical Society in the area of fuel cells, electrolyzers, and energy conversion.

The Electrochemical Society: What do you hope to accomplish in your new role as associate editor of the Journal of The Electrochemical Society?

Minhua Shao: As an associate editor, I hope to accelerate the manuscript handling process by identifying suitable reviewers and making fair decisions. I also hope to promote the journal at conferences and among peers, attracting high-quality manuscripts.

ECS: How has scholarly publishing evolved throughout your career?

MS: Scholarly publishing has changed significantly in the past two decades. Now researchers have many more choices on which journals to publish their results. The adoption of the so-called impact factor in assessing the quality of journals/papers has misled the scientific community. More seriously, there is a trend that scholarly publishing is more of a business than a platform for sharing research results.

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Open AccessOver the summer, librarians and academic leaders in Germany came together to lead a push in taking down the paywalls that block access to so many scientific research articles. The initiative, named Projekt DEAL, represents a bold push toward open access that could change the landscape of academic publishing.

The latest developments in Projekt DEAL pick up on a battle now over two years in the making, where libraries and universities in Germany have united in pushing large publishers to adopt a new business model. The institutions are looking to forego the typical subscription-based academic publishing business model in lieu of paying an annual lump sum that covers publications costs of all papers whose first authors are associated with German institutions.

The concept behind Projekt DEAL is relatively straight forward: multiply the number of papers with first authors associated with German institutions by a reasonable fee per paper. The institutions would pay that amount and those papers would then be published open access, available to everyone around the world, in exchange for free access to all of the publisher’s online content for the German institutions. This would not only mark a huge step in the open access movement, but would alleviate some of the financial burden facing libraries paying for high-cost journal subscriptions.

But this push isn’t the first of its kind. According to reports from Science, institutions from the Netherlands, Finland, Austria, and United Kingdom have all worked for similar agreements. The results, however, have been less than the libraries and universities had hoped for.

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115th AnniversaryIn addition to the newly published enhanced issues of ECS Transactions (ECST), various ECS publications will be available for purchase on-site at the 232nd ECS Meeting in National Harbor.

Anniversary deals

In commemoration of ECS’s 115th anniversary, the Society will be offering two historically significant titles at highly discounted, limited-time prices:

  • The Electrochemical Society 1902-2002: A Centennial History – $15.00
    By F. A. Trumbore and D. R. Turner (2002), 204 pages, ISBN 1-56677-326-1

In this centennial history book, Trumbore and Turner chronicle 100 years of ECS, beginning with the Society’s formation in 1902 and tracing its achievements through the scientific landscape of the twentieth century. The work is a record and a celebration. It documents ECS’s evolution into the global steward of electrochemical and solid state science and technology it is today, while honoring the individuals and efforts which contributed the Society’s enduring success and longevity. The book also includes historical information about the Society’s operations, publications, membership, and awards.

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