Disappearing Websites

WayBackMachine Logo

Luckily someone is saving everything.

Zoltan Nagy calls himself a semi-retired electrochemist, but he’s doing anything but being retired. After 15 years in a variety of electrochemical industrial research, he spent 30 years at Argonne National Laboratory carrying out research on electrode kinetics and surface electrochemistry. Now he’s at the Chemistry Department of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

He wrote to ask that we let people know the two rather popular and often visited websites:  ‘Electrochemistry  Dictionary and Encyclopedia ” and “Electrochemical Science and Technology Information Resource (ESTIR)” which were hosted by the Yeager Center at Case-Western Reserve University went off-line in January because their  computer died, and it could not be restarted there because of some new university regulations.

Work is on the way to relocate these websites to a new host, hopefully in the not too distant future.

You can have a look at what they used to be on what’s called the WayBackMachine (check out any old versions of websites BTW). Once you get there paste in electrochem.cwru.edu/encycl/ and click on January 1, 2014. Then try http://electrochem.cwru.edu/estir/ and select February 3, 2013.

It’s a gold mine of electrochemical information.

Dye-sensitized socal cell

From: Perovskite Solar Cells: Rising, Last Advances, and Future Perspectives

This post went up the other day in our ECS Linkedin group:

Perovskite Solar Cells: Rising, Last Advances, and Future Perspectives

The progress made by emerging photovoltaic technologies in the last year has been outstanding. Important steps towards the realization of silicon-free solid-state solar cells with a real potential for commercialization were taken. In particular, a number of milestones have been achieved in the development of hybrid mesoscopic and thin-film solar cells based on the use of nanocrystals of organometal halide perovskites as the light absorbers. Under this approach, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) has been boosted from values around 6-8% (hold by metal chalcogenide solar cells) to over the 19%. Such a performance is now very close to the 25% of crystalline silicon solar cells, the leading commercial technology. But the most intriguing is that these breakthroughs have been achieved in devices entirely fabricated in the solid state, which, so far, had shown worse energy conversion abilities than their counterparts based on liquid electrolytes like dye-sensitized solar cells.  Read the rest.

Join the ECS Linkedin group.

See if ECS has a technical division that focuses on your interests.