Tattoo That Harvests Energy from Persperation

Biobattery Tattoo

The biobattery tattoo that can create power through perspiration. Credit: Joseph Wang

Power through perspiration. That is the idea behind the new temporary tattoo that can store and generate electrical energy from your own sweat.

This new method was announced at the American Chemical Society meeting by Dr. Wenzhao Jia of the University of California, San Diego.

According to Jia’s explanation of the device in the journal Angewante Chemie, the temporary tattoo essentially acts as a sensor that measures the body’s lactate levels, which are the chemicals naturally present in sweat. From there, an enzyme in the sensor strips electrons from, which generates an electrical current. The current is then stored in a battery that is also built into the sensor.

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Using Hemp to Store Energy

“People ask me: why hemp? I say, why not?”

That is what Dr. David Mitlin said about the new discovery in bio-waste that has been published in the journal ACS Nano, according to BBC.

Mitlin and his team presented their findings at the American Chemical Society meeting in San Francisco, where it was explained how waste fibres from hemp can be transformed into high performance energy storage devices.

The hemp – which is legal to grow due to the absence of THC – is producing supercapacitors that are at least on par with the graphene, which is known to be the industry’s gold standard.

Dr. Mitlin and his researchers primary focusing on taking produces that are considered waste and evolving them into something applicable and with high value.

This from BBC:

But the leftover bast fibre – the inner bark – typically ends up as landfill. Dr Mitlin’s team took these fibres and recycled them into supercapacitors – energy storage devices which are transforming the way electronics are powered.

Read the full article here.

If you’re interested in Dr. Mitlin’s research, take a look at this article that he published with ECS.

Energy Storage World Forum – Rome 2015

Energy Storage World Forum

From the Energy Storage World Forum in London 2014.

Energy Storage World Forum – Rome 2015
Rome, Italy
May 19-21, 2015

The 8th Energy Storage World Forum in 2015 will take place in Rome and will include The 3rd Microgrid Forum and The 2nd Residential Energy Storage Forum.

This 3 events in one location will save you time and money and will feature over 25 Utilities/TSOs/DSOs and End Users such as TERNA, E.ON, UK POWER NETWORKS, EDF etc.

Find out more.

For speaking, sponsorship inquiries contact: emily@energystorageforum.com

Don’t forget the 2014 ECS and SMEQ (Sociedad Mexicana de Electroquímica)
Joint International Meeting October 5-9, 2014. Learn more.

$25,000, 300-Mile EV Battery

Standford Engineering

“We’re now looking for higher and higher energy density batteries, and graphite [anodes] can’t do that anymore,” said Yi Cui, a professor of material science and engineering and leader of the research team.

This from Scientific American:

A team of Stanford University researchers, including former Energy Secretary Steven Chu, believes it has achieved the “holy grail” of lithium battery design: an anode of pure lithium that could boost the range of an electric car to 300 miles.

Lithium-ion batteries are one of the most common types of rechargeable batteries on the market today. But most of the batteries—found in technologies like smartphones and electric cars—use an anode made of graphite or silicon.

Read the article.

Here’s the paper, Interconnected Hollow Carbon Nanospheres for Stable Lithium Metal Anodes, in Nature.

The Stanford researchers are using nanospheres, a protective layer of tiny carbon domes that protect the anode. Read research about nanospheres in the ECS Digital Library.

ECS Member Discount for Battery Seminars

ECS members are now eligible for a special discounted rate on EL-CELL’s seminar programs. The first, a hands-on seminar on basic battery research will be offered November 6 & 7, 2014 at the EL-CELL facility in Hamburg, Germany. The second, a hands-on seminar on advanced battery research will be offered March 12 & 13, 2015, also in Hamburg, Germany.

Logo EL-CELL farbig

Johannes Hinckeldeyn, Director of Sales and Marketing at EL-CELL, explains the strong collaboration with ECS, “EL-CELL wants to become the standard toolbox for all battery researchers. ECS is the global organization of Electrochemists and therefore our main partner to support electrochemists who want to achieve better research results. Beside our equipment, we offer special seminars for beginners and experienced researchers to learn how to conduct successful battery tests with our equipment. ECS members are cordially invited to participate and they will get special conditions for our seminars.” Please visit www.el-cell.com/service for registration and further information.

Upcoming Energy Conferences

Northeastern University

Multi-Scale Renewable Energy Storage (MRES) 2014

The 2nd Annual “Multi-Scale Renewable Energy Storage – MRES 2014″Conference
Northeastern University in Boston, August 19-21, 2014

The meeting will focus on the science, technology, policy and entrepreneurial challenges for enabling new novel energy storage solutions for the future sustainable green energy initiatives.

Conference highlights:
• Aqueous and non-aqueous flow batteries
• Next generation battery technologies and materials challenges
• Graphene, sodium and other new energy storage technologies
• Fuel cells and hydrogen storage development and infrastructure
• Safety, reliability and reproducibility across technologies and applications
• System integration, implementation and industrial application
• Government perspective and funding opportunities

Find out more.

This was posted in the ECS group on LinkedIn. Join us!

The 8th Energy World Forum
Rome, May 19-21, 2015

Each year more than 30 of the world’s leading Utilities/TSOs/DSOs gather at this exclusive Annual Forum to shape the future of Energy Storage. Find out more.

PS: Speaking of meetings in general, the 2014 ECS SMEQ Joint International Meeting in Cancun Mexico is Oct. 5-9. Early-bird registration is now open.

Pressure Sensors for Battery Packs

Below is a question raised in a discussion going on in our LinkedIn group. Consider joining.

I am looking for pressure sensor monitoring in a battery pack so that I can track the volume expansion of polymer or prismatic cells in a battery pack. Is anyone aware of any vendors that can provide samples of such sensors in consumer applications?

We have over 3,600 members in the group, ready to discuss.

If you have the answer to the above question, feel free to enter in the comments here. I’ll get it to the right place.

Find out more about our divisions, including the Batteries, Fuel Cells, and Energy Conversion Division.

Sand-base lithium ion batteries

Researchers have developed a lithium ion battery made of sand that outperforms the current standard by three times. Credit: UC Riverside.

Annie Goedkoop, Director of Publications for ECS ran across this story in Phys.org.

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside’s Bourns College of Engineering have created a lithium ion battery that outperforms the current industry standard by three times. The key material: sand. Yes, sand.

“This is the holy grail – a low cost, non-toxic, environmentally friendly way to produce high performance lithium ion battery anodes,” said Zachary Favors, a graduate student working with Cengiz and Mihri Ozkan, both engineering professors at UC Riverside.

Read the rest.

Quick shout out to Zachary Favors, the graduate student working on this, ECS has great membership deals and benefits for students!

See the 15 latest articles (more being added all the time) in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society that cover batteries and energy storage.

Patents, Open Source and Open Access

TeslaOn June 12, Tesla announced that it would no longer initiate patent lawsuits against anyone using their technology in good faith. Tesla CEO, Elon Musk, wrote this about the removal of patents from a wall in their Palo Alto lobby, “they have been removed, in the spirit of the open source movement, for the advancement of electric vehicle technology.”

Musk went on to state,

We believe that Tesla, other companies making electric cars, and the world would all benefit from a common, rapidly-evolving technology platform. Technology leadership is not defined by patents, which history has repeatedly shown to be small protection indeed against a determined competitor, but rather by the ability of a company to attract and motivate the world’s most talented engineers. We believe that applying the open source philosophy to our patents will strengthen rather than diminish Tesla’s position in this regard.

Bravo to Tesla! ECS shares similar values and launched author choice open access earlier this year. Some of our reasons for committing to open access closely parallel Mr. Musk’s remarks: the need to accelerate research, technology and innovation. A recent evaluation suggested that close to 65% of ECS technical content involves the sustainability of our planet. By opening access to the latest findings, ECS believes we can better support innovative research, reach new audiences, and enable faster scientific breakthroughs.

For more than 110 years the ECS mission has been to disseminate scientific information to the widest possible audience. Our vision for the future remains true to this goal, and expands upon it by creating uninhibited availability of ECS content through open access – an initiative that democratizes the science and hopefully, accelerates scientific progress.

Superelastic battery

One of the goals of this blog is to share some of the content we swap with each other in the office and with members around the world. And we are not just talking sharing information that we are publishing. It’s anything we find interesting.

Here’s a perfect case, Logan, who’s an editorial assistant here, emailed me this article from ChemistryWorld about a super stretchy battery with a video:

Lithium ion batteries that can be stretched by 600% have been unveiled by scientists in China. In the future, the fibre shaped batteries could be woven into textiles to satisfy the ever-growing requirement for wearable devices.

Huisheng Peng and colleagues at Fudan University made the superelastic batteries by winding two carbon nanotubes–lithium oxide composites yarns, which served as the positive and negative electrodes, onto an elastomer substrate and covering this with a layer of gel electrolyte. The batteries owe their stable electrochemical performance under stretching to the twisted structure of the fibre electrodes and the stretchability of the substrate and gel electrolyte, with the latter also acting as an anchor. When the batteries were stretched, the spring-like structure of the two electrodes was maintained.

Read the rest. The paper is free to access until July 23, 2014.

Look for more on the subject in the ESC Digital Library.

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