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ECS President | 1990-1991 Jerry M. Woodall was born and grew up in Washington, D.C. He attended MIT and received a B.S. degree in Metallurgy in 1960. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering at Cornell University in 1982. Dr. Woodall joined Clevite Transistor Products in Waltham, Massachusetts in 1960. In 1962, he joined IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York. He studied the chemistry and crystal growth of high purity bulk GaAs. This work…
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Jerry Woodall on Science and Technology Careers That Matter In our series, The ECS Community Adapts and Advances, Jerry Woodall shares insights from his long career working in industry and academia. An inventor and scientist, Jerry is best known for developing the first commercially-viable red LEDs used in automobile brake lights and traffic lights, CD/DVD players, TV remote controls, and computer networks. He received the US National Medal of Technology and Innovation for “his pioneering role in the research and development of…
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The meaning of ECS as told by its members Society members say that ECS is their professional home. It’s where they meet new colleagues and discover valuable peer collaborations. ECS connects you to a global network of scientists and engineers in academia, industry, and government—leaders in the fields of electrochemistry and solid state science and technology. Read members’ stories: ECS Community Adapts and Advances Through COVID-19 (Elizabeth Biddinger, Venkat Viswanathan, Netzahualcó yotl [Netz] Arroyo-Currá s, Marion Jones, Joe Stetter, Jerry...
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The iconic Moore’s Law will mark its 50th anniversary this Sunday, April 19th. In celebration, we’ll be taking a look at the solid state revolutionary who made the incredible prediction, the inception of the law, and the deep-rooted links between Gordon Moore and The Electrochemical Society. The initial transformation in the electronics industry began with an invention at Bell Labs in late 1947 of a little device known as the transistor. The transistor acted as a catalyst of change not…
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Honorary membership was established in 1919 for outstanding contributions to The Electrochemical Society. Qualified candidates will have contributed substantial service to ECS in some appointed or elected capacity to be considered for Honorary Membership. Nomination Deadline: None, no call for nominations Presented: At the corresponding Society meeting Recipient qualifications Included as qualifications for consideration shall be: participation in Society, Divisional, and Section activities, such as organization and arrangement of Society and/or local meetings. Special weight shall be given to participation...
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This award was established in 1971 as the Solid State Science and Technology Award for distinguished contributions to the field of solid state science and technology. In 2005, the award was renamed in honor of Gordon E. Moore. Nomination Deadline: April 15, even years Presented: Spring meeting, odd years Recipient qualifications The recipient will have made outstanding contributions to the fundamental understanding and technological applications of solid state materials, phenomena, and processes. The recipient does not need to be a...
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The Fellow of The Electrochemical Society was established in 1989 for advanced individual technological contributions in the field of electrochemical and solid state science and technology; and active membership and involvement in the affairs of The Electrochemical Society. Nomination Deadline: February 1, annual Presented: Fall meeting, annual Recipient qualifications The fellow selection will be made both on the basis of technical contributions and involvement in the activities of the Society. Technical contributions will be emphasized. It is understood that an...
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