Bonnie Gray

Bonnie Gray, professor at Simon Fraser University.

Editors’ Choice—Development of Screen-Printed Flexible Multi-Level Microfluidic Devices with Integrated Conductive Nanocomposite Polymer Electrodes on Textiles

Bonnie Gray, a professor at Simon Fraser University’s school of engineering science, was inspired by the city of Vancouver in British Columbia in her latest work.

“Vancouver is well-known for its technical clothing, and I have a lot of friends in the film industry who work in costume design. A combination of these influences and my own engineering background caused me to look further into integrating clothing with technology. That’s how I went on to become involved in developing screen-printed flexible multi-level microfluidic devices on textiles,” said Gray, which led to the fruition of her and lead author Daehan Chung‘s research paper, “Development of Screen-Printed Flexible Multi-Level Microfluidic Devices with Integrated Conductive Nanocomposite Polymer Electrodes on Textiles.”

In their open access paper, published in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, the pair “present a flexible plastisol-based microfluidic process integrated with conductive nanoparticle composite polymer (C-NCP) electrodes for flexible active microfluidic devices on textile substrates.”

According to Gray, flexible and wearable microfluidic devices are among the newest wearable devices for applications in health monitoring, drug delivery systems, and bio-signal sensing. (more…)

Free the Science with ECS Plus

Free the Science Week wraps up this coming Sunday, April 7, but Free the Science—as a movement—continues all year round, propelled in large part by the institutions and authors that take advantage of the benefits of ECS Plus.

(more…)

ECS Supports Green Open Access

Free the Science Week celebrates those working to eliminate barriers to access for researchers around the world.

Yesterday’s blog post discussed ECS’s Author Choice Open Access program, which enables many authors to publish open access at no cost to them.

But did you know that the Society also supports green open access?

ECS’s green open access policy allows you to freely and immediately share the articles you publish in ECS journals without using an open access article credit or paying an article processing charge.

(more…)

Publish Author Choice Open Access

With Free the Science Week in full swing, readers have free, uninhibited access to the more than 151,000 articles and abstracts in the ECS Digital Library until Sunday, April 7.

But the Free the Science initiative isn’t just about making research free to access; it’s also about making research free to publish.

So one of the best ways you can celebrate Free the Science Week is by making plans to publish your next ECS article Author Choice Open Access.

(more…)

Not sure what to download during Free the Science Week?

Over 37% of the ECS journal content published since 2014 is open access—free to access all year round. During Free the Science Week, which runs until April 7, you have free access to the other 63% of this content (and much more) ordinarily found behind the paywall.

The lists below compile this year’s most-read articles typically found behind the paywall from the Journal of The Electrochemical Society, the ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology, and ECS Transactions.

Download them while they’re free to access!

(more…)

ECS’s third annual Free the Science Week kicks off today! From now through Sunday, April 7, you have unrestricted access to all of the research ever published in the ECS Digital Library.

Here are some tips for navigating the digital library’s more than 151,000 articles and abstracts—and making the most of the week of free access.

(more…)

The urgency for open access publishing has been felt for some time. The strain of paywalls and expensive scholarly publishing business models have limited access to academic papers and research, causing some to take matters into their own hands.

The Electrochemical Society is one of those to take action. Each year, ECS participates in International Open Access Week by taking down paywalls to the entire ECS Digital Library, giving the world a preview of what complete open access to peer-reviewed scientific research will look like. ECS is also the founder of the Free the Science initiative, which aims to make the Society’s high quality, peer-reviewed research free for everyone to read and free for authors to publish. In addition, in honor of Free the Science, the Society also offers another paywall-free week to the ECS Digital Library. This year marking the Society’s 3rd annual Free the Science Week, taking place April 1-7, where thousands of scientific articles and abstracts will become free to access.

And, it looks like ECS is far from alone in these efforts. (more…)

Open Access Plan Sparks Debate

Plan S, created in a move to crack down on scholarly journals’ paywalls, is receiving pushback from scientists who call the plan “too risky for science.” According to Science Magazine, the scientists put their feelings into writing in an open letter backed by 800 signatories who say they support OA—which would make papers free and available to all—but not like this. (more…)

With top academic publishers like Elsevier holding a 35-40% profit margin and for-profit academic publishers earning $25.2 billion a year, Jason Schmitt began to wonder about the consequences of paywalls on access to scientific research. His questions led to his October 2018 documentary film, Paywall: The Business of Scholarship, where he questioned publishing practices and the public’s limited access to information.

According to IMDb, while filming, Schmitt says he was struck by the global energy and enthusiasm toward open access and the strong resistance to the movement by many of the world’s top publishers. “Further, I found that the funds paid to academic publishers are heavily burdening the higher education market, contributing to the rising tuition fees at all universities, the closure of many institutions and, ultimately, limiting science and progress.” (more…)

Stuart Taylor

Stuart Taylor Credit: OASPA

The Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association recently sat down with Stuart Taylor, publishing director of the Royal Society and their very own, newly appointed OASPA board member, for an interview. Taylor holds 30 years of experience in publishing and has witnessed many changes within the industry, such as the introduction of the open access model.

“I began in the commercial sector. Back then, open access wasn’t a topic I was aware of at all and the concept of open access publishing hadn’t even been invented,” says Taylor.

By the end of the 1990s, however, Taylor says the rumblings of an open access model began to make its presence within the publishing community, which at that time, “Was seen only as a threat to commercial companies. Something to be fought or at least contained.” (more…)

  • Page 1 of 9