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Amy C. Marschilok, Ph.D.
Co-Director, Institute for Electrochemically Stored Energy
Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry
Adjunct Faculty, Materials Science and Chemical Engineering
Stony Brook University, U.S.

Energy Storage Division Manager and Scientist, Interdisciplinary Science Department
Brookhaven National Laboratory, U.S.

Date: August 25, 2021
Time: 1300h EDT
Sponsor: Hiden Analytical

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Join the ECS Canada Section for its Spring 2021 Meeting on Saturday, May 15.

Keynote speaker

Electrochemistry for a Sustainable and Healthier Future
Dr. Wolfgang Schuhmann, FRSC
Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany 

Other confirmed speakers

Shelley Minteer, University of Utah, U.S.
Sanela Martic, Trent University, Canada
Maria de Rosa, Carleton University, Canada
David Herbert, University of Manitoba, Canada
Leanne Chen, University of Guelph, Canada
Philippe Dauphin Ducharme, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada (more…)

IE&EE Division Awards

Nomination Deadline: September 15, 2018

Are you a student of electrochemical engineering and/or applied electrochemistry?  Do you teach or mentor students within these areas?  If the answer is ‘yes’ to either question, then the following information is for you! The ECS Industrial Electrochemistry and Electrochemical Engineering Division invites you to nominate qualified student (s) for the following division awards:

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The winner of the 2018 Canada Section Student Award is Shuai Chen!

Shuai (Sharon) Chen graduated from Lakehead University with an MSc in electrochemistry. She worked on fundamental studies of Pd based materials for hydrogen storage and purification. Her research provided a thoughtful guidance for commercial hydrogen purification films. During this period, she was awarded a travel grant from the ECS Physical and Analytical Electrochemistry Division and the High Output and Publication Excellence Award from Lakehead University.

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New paper-based, point-of-care diagnostic tools could lead to improvements in device cost, weight, and flexibility. The recently developed SPEDs, or self-powered, paper-based electrochemical device, can detect biomarkers such as glucose and white blood cells, all while remaining easy to read for non-experts.

The Purdue University research team behind this project believes it could be applicable for patients in regions where access to sophisticated medical equipment is limited.

“You could consider this a portable laboratory that is just completely made out of paper, is inexpensive and can be disposed of through incineration,” says Ramses V. Martinez, an assistant professor of industrial and biomedical engineering at Purdue University. “We hope these devices will serve untrained people located in remote villages or military bases to test for a variety of diseases without requiring any source of electricity, clean water, or additional equipment.”

Access to clean drinking water remains an issues around the globe, with 663 million people lacking access to safe water sources. Current scientific methods that work to remove small and diluted pollutants from water tend to be either energy or chemical intensive. New research from a team at MIT provides insight into a new process of removing even extremely low levels of unwanted compounds.

This from MIT:

The system uses a novel method, relying on an electrochemical process to selectively remove organic contaminants such as pesticides, chemical waste products, and pharmaceuticals, even when these are present in small yet dangerous concentrations. The approach also addresses key limitations of conventional electrochemical separation methods, such as acidity fluctuations and losses in performance that can happen as a result of competing surface reactions.

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Water purificationAccess to adequate water and sanitation is a major obstacle that impacts nations across the globe. Currently 1 in 10 people – or 663 million – lack access to safe water. Due to the global water crisis, more than 1.5 billion people are affected by water-related diseases every year. However, many of those disease causing organisms could be removed from water with hydrogen peroxide, but production and distribution of hydrogen peroxide is a challenge in many parts of the world that struggle with this crisis.

Now, a team of researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have develop a small device that can produce hydrogen peroxide with a little help from renewable energy sources (i.e. conventional solar panels).

“The idea is to develop an electrochemical cell that generates hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and water on site, and then use that hydrogen peroxide in groundwater to oxidize organic contaminants that are harmful for humans to ingest,” says Chris Hahn, a SLAC scientist.

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HIV and hepatitis C are among the leading causes of worldwide death. According to amfAR, an organization dedicated to eradicating the spread of HIV/AIDS through innovative research, nearly 37 million people are currently living with HIV. Of those 37 million, one third become co-infected with hepatitis C.

The threat of HIV and hepatitis C

The regions hit the hardest by this co-infection tend to be developing parts of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa and Central and East Asia.

While these developing regions have measures to diagnosis HIV and hepatitis C, the rapid point-of-care tests used are typically unaffordable or unreliable.

An electrochemical solution

A group from McGill University is looking to change that with a recently developed, paper-based electrochemical platform with multiplexing and telemedicine capabilities that may enable low-cost, point-of-care diagnosis for HIV and hepatitis C co-infections within serum samples.

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