Interested in Being a Session Chair?

Session chairs serve as an integral role in the ECS meetings. We try our best to encourage early-career risers, post-grads, and young authors to get involved in the meetings by acting as session chairs. Although this is a volunteer-based program, it is a great networking opportunity, as it puts you in front of other scientists, engineers, and researchers sharing their work.

Interested in being a session chair at a symposium at the 237th ECS Meeting with the 18th International Meeting on Chemical Sensors (IMCS 2020) in Montréal? Check out the call for papers and reach out to the lead organizer!

Read the here guidelines for session chairs.

Join The Electrochemical Society on August 19–23 at the 256th ACS National Meeting & Exposition in Boston, MA.

The ACS meeting is a great opportunity for ECS to connect with our members and other interested scientists, researchers, and academics to discuss what’s new and exciting in the field and with ECS. The ACS meeting offers a place for chemistry professionals to meet and share ideas. There will be over 16,000 attendees and over 300 exhibitors at this year’s Boston meeting, offering workshops, career training, social events, new technology and research, and career development opportunities.

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Member Spotlight – Vilas Pol

Vilas Pol has assisting in discovering a nanoparticle network that could bright fast-charging batteries. He joined the Society in 2012.Credit: Argonne National Laboratory

Vilas Pol has assisted in the discovery of a nanoparticle network that could bring fast-charging batteries. He joined the Society in 2012.
Credit: Argonne National Laboratory

The Electrochemical Society’s Vilas Pol, along with a team of Purdue University researchers, has developed a nanoparticle network that could produce very fast-charging batteries.

This new electrode design for lithium-ion batteries has been shown to potentially reduce the charging time from hours to minutes, all by replacing the conventional graphite electrode with a network of tin-oxide nanoparticles.

This from Purdue University:

The researchers have performed experiments with a “porous interconnected” tin-oxide based anode, which has nearly twice the theoretical charging capacity of graphite. The researchers demonstrated that the experimental anode can be charged in 30 minutes and still have a capacity of 430 milliamp hours per gram (mAh g−1), which is greater than the theoretical maximum capacity for graphite when charged slowly over 10 hours.

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