2019 ECS Young Author Awards

Jan Schwämmlein and Jiancheng Yang won the ECS 2019 Young Author Awards.  The awards were presented at the 236th ECS Meeting in Atlanta, GA, on October 13-17, 2019. Schwämmlein received the Norman Hackerman Young Author Award for his paper, “Origin of Superior HOR/HER Activity of Bimetallic Pt-Ru Catalysts in Alkaline Media Identified via Ru@Pt Core-Shell Nanoparticles.” The prize, which honors corrosion expert Norman Hackerman, is given to the best paper published in the Journal of The Electrochemical Society in the previous year. Yang received the Bruce Deal and Andy Grove Young Author Award for his paper, “2300V Reverse Breakdown Voltage Ga2O3 Schottky Rectifiers.” This award, established in honor of semiconductor industry pioneers Andy Grove and Bruce Deal, recognizes the best paper published in the ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology in the previous year. The two young authors’ articles are free to read. They join a distinguished group of scientists; Stanley M. Whittingham, co-winner of the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, won the ECS Young Author’s Award in 1971.

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Shimshon Gottesfeld received the 2019 Olin Palladium Award at the 236th Electrochemical Society (ECS) Meeting.  The award recognizes distinguished contributions to the field of electrochemical or corrosion science.  Gottesfeld talk, “Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells: Recognition of a Field of Electrochemistry for Technical Contributions Made by Outstanding Technical Teams,” is on Wednesday, 16 October, at 1640h in Galleria 2.

Shimshon Gottesfeld

Gottesfeld is an emeritus member and fellow of ECS.  He received his PhD in chemistry from Technion – Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. He joined the staff of the Department of Chemistry at the University of Tel Aviv in 1972. Gottesfeld spent an extended sabbatical leave between 1977 and 1979 at Bell Labs in Murray Hill, New Jersey. In 2015, Gottesfeld was nominated adjunct professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering of the University of Delaware. (more…)

John B. Goodenough

Christina Bock, president of the Board of The Electrochemical Society (ECS), congratulated John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham, and Akira Yoshino who today were jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

“On behalf of the entire ECS community, I would like to extend my sincerest congratulations to our esteemed members: John Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham, and Akira Yoshino on being awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry ‘for the development of Lithium-ion batteries,’” said Bock. “This is fitting recognition for the truly groundbreaking advancements these pioneers have made for our field and for the whole of humanity. Simply put, their research is the enabling science upon which the solutions to the grand challenges facing the planet—renewable energy, clean transportation, communications to name but a few—will be based. We are honored to count their almost 60 years of combined membership among our ranks.” (more…)

Join the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine for a workshop, Advances, Challenges, and Long-Term Opportunities for Electrochemistry: Addressing Societal Needs. The workshop is on November 18-19, 2019 in Washington, DC. under the auspices of the Chemical Sciences Roundtable of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.

The workshop features sessions on the latest applications of electrochemistry in energy storage, energy conversion, and electrosynthesis. In addition to technical talks, speakers and the audience will discuss the resource, training, and workforce needs to advance electrochemistry in the United States. (more…)

Women at the Forefront of Science

As ECS celebrates the 40-year-anniversary of its first female president, Joan Berkowitz, it is important to note that ECS has a tradition of showcasing women in the sciences at its meetings. Carol A. Bessel, acting division director at the National Science Foundation (NSF), was the highlighted speaker at the annual business meeting at the 235th ECS Meeting. Valerie Browning, director of the Defense Advances Research Projects Agency (DARPA)’s Defense Sciences Office (DSO), will deliver the ECS Lecture at the plenary session of the 236th ECS Meeting. If including, recognizing, and hearing women is critical to attracting and retaining talented women in the sciences, then Bessel and Browning are shining examples of women leading the way. (more…)

David Lockwood

David Lockwood

The Electrochemical Society values professional and volunteer achievement in the multi-disciplinary sciences. The ECS awards reflect the professional recognition of peers. At meeting plenary sessions, participants from every symposia come together to recognize award winners—some of the greatest minds in the field—and learn about their latest research.

ECS Fellow David J. Lockwood received the Gordon E. Moore Award for Outstanding Achievement in Solid State Science and Technology at the plenary session of the 235th ECS Meeting. This award recognizes outstanding contributions to the fundamental understanding and technological applications of solid state materials, phenomena, and processes. Lockwood is a physicist and researcher emeritus at the National Research Council of Canada. His research centers on the optical properties of low-dimensional materials and focuses on Group IV and III-V semiconductor nanostructures. Lockwood presented “Silicon-Based Photonic Integrated Circuits: The Quest for Compatible Light Sources” at the 235th ECS Meeting Plenary Session. (more…)

For the legendary actor Alan Alda, it was the same curiosity that drew him into acting that propelled him into the world of science.

“I remember as a kid always trying to figure out why things were the way they were. How they got to be the way that they were,” says Alda. He was fascinated with the world around him, from examining a flame at the end of a candle to contemplating human behavior. “Why did adults say the things they said and why they behave the way they did?”

Then, an opportunity arose that mixed a little bit of each world. Alda was asked to host the television show Scientific American Frontiers. A show that discussed new technologies and discoveries in science and medicine.

“I said ‘yes’ on the condition I could actually interview the scientists and not just read a narration,” says Alda, “because I really wanted to hear from the scientists about their work. And I wanted to understand it better. That kind of lead to what I do now which is to help scientists communicate better.”

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Hieu Quang Pham, the Korea Section Student Award winner for 2018.

Nomination Deadline: September 30, 2018

ECS recognizes outstanding technical achievements in electrochemistry and solid-state science and technology through its Honors & Awards Program. There are many deserving members of the Korea Section among us and this is an opportunity to highlight their contributions.

We are currently accepting nominations for the following award:

Korea Section Student Award was established in 2005 to recognize academic accomplishments in any area of science or engineering in which electrochemical and/or solid state science and technology is the central consideration. The award is intended to encourage students who are pursuing a PhD at a Korean university to initiate or continue careers in the field.

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An online platform that had once offered a voice to scientists – to join in on debates and discussions of other scientists and inquisitive minds – may now be a thing of the past. Social news website Reddit hosts r/science, one of the world’s largest online science communities, which ran a popular Ask Me Anything Q&A (AMA) series that picked the brains of academics about topics like climate change, physics, and astronomy has come to an end. This was all due to a change in Reddit’s algorithm, changing how posts were ranked and making it nearly impossible to compete with the charm of cute animal GIF’s in the competition of upvotes.

The demise of the Ask Me Anything Q&A series is considered a major setback for the science community. The forum grew to nearly 19 million users, now left with no other platform that offers quite the same reach, accessibility, and engagement.

With flat-earthers, anti-vaxxers, climate change deniers, and the rest of the anti-science brigade making their views heard in almost every corner of the internet, it’s a difficult time for those who value insightful discussion of peer-reviewed science online,” says Alastair McCloskey, a digital content coordinator in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Sheffield. Read his full article here.

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SemiconductorEngineers have created a high-frequency electronic chip potentially capable of transmitting tens of gigabits of data per second, much faster than the fastest internet available today.

Omeed Momeni, an assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at University of California, Davis, and doctoral student Hossein Jalili designed the chip using a phased array antenna system. Phased array systems funnel the energy from multiple sources into a single beam that can be narrowly steered and directed to a specific location.

“Phased arrays are pretty difficult to create, especially at higher frequencies,” Momeni says. “We are the first to achieve this much bandwidth at this frequency.”

The chip prototyped by Momeni and Jalili successfully operates at 370 GHz with 52 GHz of bandwidth. For comparison, FM radio waves broadcast between 87.5 and 108 MHz; 4G and LTE cellular networks generally function between 800 MHz and 2.6 GHz with up to 20 MHz of bandwidth.

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