Deadline for Submitting Abstracts
March 30, 2018
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Topic Close-up #10

Symposium G02: Atomic Layer Deposition Applications 14

Symposium Focus: This symposium focuses on a variety of applications of ALD and other atomic layer-by-layer processing in semiconductor CMOS (e.g. high-k oxides and metals for memories like Flash and 3D NAND, MIM, MIS capacitors), photovoltaics, energy storage and conversion, catalysis, optics and photonics, smart coatings of nanoporous materials, MLD and hybrid ALD/MLD, fundamentals of ALD processing: reaction mechanisms, in-situ measurement, modeling, theory, new precursors and delivery systems, optical and photonic applications, productivity enhancement, scale-up and commercialization of ALD equipment and processes for rigid and flexible substrates, including roll-to-roll deposition, spatial ALD, area-selective ALD, Atomic Layer Etching (‘reverse ALD’) and related topics aiming at self-limited etching.


Award winner DeijunThe winner of the 2018 Energy Technology Division Graduate Student Award sponsored by Bio-Logic is Deijun Xiong!

Each year, the ECS Energy Technology Division recognizes and rewards promising young engineers and scientists in fields pertaining to this division. The award was established in 2012 and is intended to encourage the recipients to initiate or continue careers in this field. ECS is proud to acknowledge Bio-Logic for its generous sponsorship of this award. Recipients receive a framed certificate, a $1,000 prize, complimentary student meeting registration and complimentary admission to the onsite division leadership meeting. The nomination deadline is September 1 of each year.

Deijun Xiong completed his PhD in chemistry at Dalhousie University in October 2017 under the supervision of Jeff Dahn.

During his PhD, he mainly focused on understanding the failure of high voltage LiNixMnyCo(1-x-y)O2 (NMC) cells and developing functional electrolyte for high voltage NMC cells. He put forward a novel “pouch bag” method to deepen understanding of the crosstalks occurring in Li-ion cells. He provided new support that oxygen can be released from charged polycrystalline NMC materials rather than single crystal NMC materials at mild temperature at high voltage. He also made contributions to develop ethylene carbonate-free electrolytes for high voltage NMC cells.
In December 2017, Deijun joined Shenzhen Capchem Technology Co. Ltd (one of the leading Li-ion battery and supercapacitor electrolyte companies in the world) as vice director of research and development to develop functional electrolytes for Li-ion battery and supercapacitor.

Spring 2018 division awards will be conferred at the 233rd ECS Meeting in Seattle, WA from May 13-17, 2018. Join Deijun as he delivers his award talk called “Understanding Crosstalks in Li-Ion Cells” on Wednesday, May 16 | 0820h in Room 608 of the Washington State Convention & Trade Center.

Short Courses in Seattle

Short CourseECS has scheduled three short courses to be held at the 233rd ECS Meeting in Seattle, WA. The courses will be held on Sunday, May 13, 2018 from 0900h to 1430h. Registration for a short course includes a breakfast (0800-0900h), lunch, and morning/afternoon coffee breaks.

The offerings are:

Short course #1: Advanced Impedance Spectroscopy | Course description
Mark Orazem, Instructor

Short course #2: Rechargeable Battery Materials | Course description
Shirley Meng and Boryann Liaw, Instructors

Short course #3: Electrodeposition Fundamentals and Applications | Course description
Stanko Brankovic and Giovanni Zangari, Instructors

Pre-registration for a short course is required by Monday, May 7, 2018. The registration fee for each course includes participation in the course, materials, continental breakfast, luncheon, and refreshment breaks; the short course registration fee does not include or apply to the general meeting registration, and it is not applicable to any other activities of the meeting. All individuals participating in short courses along with the meeting are required to register for both events.

Register by the early bird deadline of April 9, 2018 to receive a meeting and short course registration discount!


Download Content for Free

Open Access WeekECS will host its second Free the Science Week April 2-8, 2018, allowing free access to the research content in the ECS Digital Library including the Journal of The Electrochemical Society and the ECS Journal of Solid State Science and Technology. That means access and free downloads to over 141,000 articles and abstracts including ECS Transactions.

The first Free the Science Week was a success. Below are some of the statistics about the ECS Digital Library from April 2017:

2017 Free the Science results










Women in STEMEvery year, we celebrate International Women’s Day on March 8 as a way to commemorate the movement for women’s rights. This global holiday honors the social, economic, cultural, political – and in our case – scientific achievements of women.

Additionally, International Women’s Day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity. Currently, women remain underrepresented in the STEM workforce, although to a lesser degree than the past. According to the National Science Foundation, the greatest gender disparities still exist in the fields of engineering, computer science, and physical science.

In the U.S., women make up half of the entire workforce, but only 29 percent of the science and engineering field. While the gender gap may still exist for women in STEM, many phenomenal female scientists have entered the field over the years and left an indelible mark on the science.

Take Nettie Stevens (born 1861), the foremost researcher in sex determination, whose work was initially rejected because of her sex. Or Mary Engle Pennington (born 1872), an American chemist at the turn of the 20th century, pioneering research that allows us to process, store, and ship food safely. Barbara McClintock (born 1902) was deemed crazy when she suggested that genes jump from chromosome to chromosome. Of course, she was later awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for her discovery of genetic transportation.


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Only one month left to save $125 on registration!

The 233rd ECS Meeting will take place May 13-17, 2018 at the Seattle Sheraton and Washington State Convention Center.

If our strong technical program, of over 2,600 abstracts being presented in 43 symposia across five days, wasn’t enough of a reason to join us, check out some of the other exciting events taking place in Seattle.


VoteThe 2018 Society elections are upon us and ECS wants you to learn more about the candidates, from the candidates. All voting members are eligible to participate via electronic proxy.

About ECS elections

The early months of each year are an exciting time here at ECS as officer elections take place via electronic proxy in the two-month period from January 15 to March 15, 2018. Elected officers constitute the organization’s executive committee and include the following positions: president, three vice presidents, secretary, and treasurer. The nominating committee determines the candidates and you determine the winner.

This Q&A series allows you a personal glimpse of each volunteer on the current ballot. There is a total of five candidates (one for president and two each for vice president and treasurer). Take a moment to read the full candidate biography and election statement.


Outstanding Student Chapter

The University of Maryland was the 2017 Outstanding Student Chapter Award winner. Learn more about their chapter activities.

The ECS Outstanding Student Chapter Award was established in 2012 to recognize distinguished student chapters that demonstrate active participation in The Electrochemical Society’s technical activities, establish community and outreach activities in the areas of electrochemical and solid state science and engineering education, and create and maintain a robust membership base.

Click here for complete rules and nomination requirements. Nominations are being accepted for the 2018 award, which will be presented at the AiMES 2018 meeting in Cancun, Mexico from September 30 – October 4, 2018.

The recipient of the Outstanding Student Chapter Award receives a recognition plaque, $1,000 USD in additional student chapter funding, and additional recognition throughout the Society in Interface, the ECS blog, etc.


By: Nir Kshetri, University of North Carolina – Greensboro

IOTThe world is full of connected devices – and more are coming. In 2017, there were an estimated 8.4 billion internet-enabled thermostats, cameras, streetlights and other electronics. By 2020 that number could exceed 20 billion, and by 2030 there could be 500 billion or more. Because they’ll all be online all the time, each of those devices – whether a voice-recognition personal assistant or a pay-by-phone parking meter or a temperature sensor deep in an industrial robot – will be vulnerable to a cyberattack and could even be part of one.

Today, many “smart” internet-connected devices are made by large companies with well-known brand names, like Google, Apple, Microsoft and Samsung, which have both the technological systems and the marketing incentive to fix any security problems quickly. But that’s not the case in the increasingly crowded world of smaller internet-enabled devices, like light bulbs, doorbells and even packages shipped by UPS. Those devices – and their digital “brains” – are typically made by unknown companies, many in developing countries, without the funds or ability – or the brand-recognition need – to incorporate strong security features.


HydrogenResearchers at KTH have successfully tested a new material that can be used for cheap and large-scale production of hydrogen – a promising alternative to fossil fuel.

Precious metals are the standard catalyst material used for extracting hydrogen from water. The problem is these materials – such as platinum, ruthenium and iridium – are too costly to make the process viable. A team from KTH Royal Institute of Technology recently announced a breakthrough that could change the economics of a hydrogen economy.

Led by Licheng Sun, professor of molecular electronics at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, the researchers concluded that precious metals can be replaced by a much cheaper combination of nickel, iron and copper (NiFeCu).


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