Bentley Gives EVs the Red Light

High-end, high-class, and high-cost are all words synonymous with the word Bentley. The luxury car CEO Adrian Hallmark says he plans to keep it that way, and for that reason, he’s giving the inclusion of electric vehicles to the Bentley family the red light—for now.

Hallmark says battery technology has not evolved to the point where it would be possible to develop an ultraluxury electric vehicles, according to Tires and Parts. (more…)

Credit: ACS Publications

Most of us don’t stop to think about it, but the skin on our body is pretty remarkable. The largest organ in the body can detect pressure, temperature changes, pain, and touch, all made possible thanks to the many nerves and receptors underneath our skin. With all that said, it’s easy to understand why it’s hard to duplicate this unique organ. But, according to ScienceDaily, researchers are working to do just that. Their goal is to reproduce and transfer these qualities into a manmade electronic skin technology that can be used in prosthetic devices, wearable health monitors, robotics, and virtual reality. (more…)

Clarivate Analytics has recently published its annual list of Highly Cited Researchers with the overarching declaration that “whether ‘Highly Cited’ or ‘Hot,’ these researchers are making a significant impact.”

Some of our most distinguished ECS members have been noted this year as the “world’s most influential scientific minds” often listed multiple times in the categories of physics, chemistry, and materials science.

Below, find a short list of those members of The Electrochemical Society whose research on electrochemistry and solid state science and technology is shaping the scientific discourse. Read the full article.

Hector Abruna
Radoslav Adzic (F)
Khalil Amine (F)
Peter Bruce

Prashant Kamat (F)
Nathan Lewis
Arumugam Manthiram (F)
Stefano Passerini

Jaephil Cho
Yury Gogotsi (F)
Bruno Scrosati (F)
Yang Shao-Horn (F)
Peter Strasser

(more…)

30 Under 30 in Energy

Perk up people, this is the Forbes list 30 under 30 in energy edition. According to Forbes, each year their reporters spend months combing through possible contestants. Questionnaires, online digging, contact recommendations, and a panel of expert judges all help sift through to the top remaining candidates.

This year, Forbes focused on the movers and shakers of the battery field. With a worldwide $200 billion a year investment in wind and solar power generation projects, the revolution in renewables, and the transition to low-carbon energy sources is undeniable. And for that reason, we highlight three—just the tip of the iceburg—from the top thirty list.

Meghana Bollimpalli

Meghana Bollimpalli/Credit: Forbes

I don’t know what you were doing when you were 17, but Meghana Bollimpalli, a student at Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas was inspired by a seminar on energy storage. Bollimpalli began working towards figuring out a way to make supercapacitors from cheaper materials. She discovered a mixture of tea powder, molasses, and tannin, with a pinch of phosphorous and nitrogen, could achieve the same performance as a platinum-based electrode, for just $1 each, taking home the 2018 Intel Foundation Young Scientist award. Not bad for a high school student. (more…)

3D‑printed Glucose Biosensors

Arda Gozen, assistant professor, WSU School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. Photo Credit: WSU

Living with any disease isn’t easy. In particular, when it comes to living with diabetes, it involves an imposed routine of finger pricking and monitoring of glucose levels in order to simply maintain a healthy lifestyle. So you can imagine, any technology that can ease the sting is welcomed. Researchers at Washington State University have developed a 3D‑printed glucose biosensor for use in wearable monitors that may forever change how millions monitor their glucose levels.

According to Futurism, the research team—led by Arda Gozen and Yuehe Lin—have developed 3D-printed sensors that could stick to a person’s skin and monitor glucose via bodily fluids, like sweat. The 3D-printed glucose monitor offers much better stability and sensitivity than those manufactured through traditional methods, according to Washington State University. In addition, compared to traditional manufacturing processes, these 3D-printed sensors also cut down costs and reduce waste like expensive cleanroom processing and harmful chemicals. (more…)

Haodong Liu, recipient of the Battery Division Postdoctoral Associate Research Award Sponsored by MTI Corporation and the Jiang Family Foundation

Haodong Liu, a postdoc research fellow at UC San Diego, is the award winner of the Battery Division Postdoctoral Associate Research Award Sponsored by MTI Corporation and the Jiang Family Foundation for his work on “Stable Li Metal Anode through Designed Solution Chemistry and Electrode Architecture.” Liu was presented with the award at AiMES 2018 in Cancun, Mexico.

Liu says being recognized for his work has been an exciting experience, bringing recognition to his name and research within the battery field. However, it has also meant something more to him in particular.

“Since my citizenship is in China, and a lot of the scholarships here are only for the US citizens, this is a good chance for international postdocs to get awards and be recognized,” explains Liu. “ECS only cares about the quality of the work you’re doing instead of what’s your citizenship status. That’s why I really appreciate ECS.” (more…)

2019 ECS Meetings!

ECS is excited to host and support the events below in 2019. We are already working hard on making these meetings a success and we hope that you will start planning the ways you’ll be able to participate or partner with us next year!

IBA 2019 – International Battery Association

March 3-8, 2019
San Diego, California
Important Deadline:

  • Early Registration: February 1, 2019 (more…)

The 2018 San Francisco Section Daniel Cubicciotti Student Award Goes to Yuzhang Li!

Yuzhang Li is a PhD student working with Professor Yi Cui on next-generation energy storage technologies at Stanford University. His research approach seeks to tackle problems from both an applied and fundamental perspective, which is necessary for the development of high energy density batteries. (more…)

Jon Ustarroz

Jon Ustarroz, recipient of the Electrodeposition Division Early Career Investigator Award

Jon Ustarroz, assistant professor of the Analytical & Interfacial Chemistry group at the Université libre de Bruxelles and part-time research professor of the Electrochemical and Surface Engineering group (SURF) at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, is the recipient of the Electrodeposition Division Early Career Investigator Award for his paper on “Electrochemical Growth Mediated by Nanocluster Aggregation: Implications and Perspectives.” He was honored with the award at AiMES 2018 in Cancun, Mexico.

Ustarroz says he’s proud to be a recipient of the award, which adds to his recognition within the field.

“For somebody who is young like me, and little people know about within the academic community, this has allowed me to get higher visibility and to prove to people who do not know me of what I’m capable of,” says Ustarroz.

(more…)

Jacobsen Award Winner: Jamie Noël

Congratulations to Jamie Noël on winning the 2019 ECS Canada Section R.C. Jacobsen Award.

The ECS Canada Section has four awards within the recognition program. The Canada Section R.C. Jacobsen Award was established in 1986 to recognize notable and significant contributions to the functioning of the Canada Section. The award is for dedicated members who have and continue to make a difference to the Canada Section and ECS as a whole. (more…)

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